Auto DraftDick Durbin- IL

Current Position: US Senator since 1997
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): US Representative from 1983 – 1997

Featured Quote: 
This country needs a new Civilian Conservation Corps for the 21st century. We can put Americans to work, preserve our precious natural parks, and protect the environment—all at once. More about my plan with @RepBobbyRush

Featured Video: 
Sen. Dick Durbin’s closing remarks at Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court hearing

Other Positions:

Senate Judiciary Committee, Chair

During today’s Senate Judiciary Committee hearing entitled “Dereliction of Duty: Examining the Inspector General’s Report on the FBI’s Handling of the Larry Nassar Investigation,” U.S. Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL), Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, asked FBI Director Christopher Wray to explain the FBI’s abdication of responsibility and failure to investigate the Nassar case.

“What strikes me here is there doesn’t ever seem to be a sense of urgency or immediacy in that Indianapolis Field Office,” Durbin said. “What am I missing here? This is like a child kidnapping case. This man is on the loose molesting children and it appears that [the case] is being lost in the paperwork of the agency.”

Wray answered by stating he shares Durbin’s bewilderment and outrage over the FBI’s failures and that it has been utterly jarring to him. Wray said what happened in the Nassar case is totally inconsistent with what FBI trains its people on and how hundreds of other agents approach these kinds of cases every day. Wray added that within the past week, the FBI fired a Supervisory Special Agent who attempted to cover up his mishandling of the Nassar allegations by doctoring paperwork and lying to the Inspector General.

Durbin then asked Wray whether the FBI has learned to improve how it questions individuals – such as the USA Gymnastics athletes – for cases involving sexual abuse.

“For three hours [McKayla Maroney] is sitting on her bedroom floor, going through an interview, in which you could tell was by a person, whoever it was, was totally insensitive to this young woman’s tragic experience. What has the FBI learned from that?” Durbin asked.

i

SPRINGFIELD – U.S. Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL) today met virtually with leaders of Illinois environmental groups to discuss the state’s clean energy and infrastructure priorities. On the call, Durbin provided details on the passed budget resolution and suggested provisions in the upcoming reconciliation bill, including a Clean Electricity Payment Program (CEPP), which would pay utilities to produce more clean energy each year. Durbin and the environmental leaders went on to discuss the electric vehicle revolution taking place in Illinois and the proposed inclusion of the Clean Energy for America Act in the reconciliation bill to form the basis of clean energy tax provisions. Durbin also touched on his support for organized labor in the clean energy movement and formally protecting collective bargaining through the PRO Act.

“With Congress set to take up President Biden’s Build Back Better agenda in the coming months, we have a real opportunity to dedicate ourselves to instituting new forms of clean energy across industries,” said Durbin. “Illinois is fortunate to have engaged organizations leading the effort for a cleaner planet for future generations.”

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 1997
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): US Representative from 1983 – 1997

Featured Quote: 
This country needs a new Civilian Conservation Corps for the 21st century. We can put Americans to work, preserve our precious natural parks, and protect the environment—all at once. More about my plan with @RepBobbyRush

Featured Video: 
Sen. Dick Durbin’s closing remarks at Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court hearing

Other Positions:

Senate Judiciary Committee, Chair

News

During today’s Senate Judiciary Committee hearing entitled “Dereliction of Duty: Examining the Inspector General’s Report on the FBI’s Handling of the Larry Nassar Investigation,” U.S. Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL), Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, asked FBI Director Christopher Wray to explain the FBI’s abdication of responsibility and failure to investigate the Nassar case.

“What strikes me here is there doesn’t ever seem to be a sense of urgency or immediacy in that Indianapolis Field Office,” Durbin said. “What am I missing here? This is like a child kidnapping case. This man is on the loose molesting children and it appears that [the case] is being lost in the paperwork of the agency.”

Wray answered by stating he shares Durbin’s bewilderment and outrage over the FBI’s failures and that it has been utterly jarring to him. Wray said what happened in the Nassar case is totally inconsistent with what FBI trains its people on and how hundreds of other agents approach these kinds of cases every day. Wray added that within the past week, the FBI fired a Supervisory Special Agent who attempted to cover up his mishandling of the Nassar allegations by doctoring paperwork and lying to the Inspector General.

Durbin then asked Wray whether the FBI has learned to improve how it questions individuals – such as the USA Gymnastics athletes – for cases involving sexual abuse.

“For three hours [McKayla Maroney] is sitting on her bedroom floor, going through an interview, in which you could tell was by a person, whoever it was, was totally insensitive to this young woman’s tragic experience. What has the FBI learned from that?” Durbin asked.

i

SPRINGFIELD – U.S. Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL) today met virtually with leaders of Illinois environmental groups to discuss the state’s clean energy and infrastructure priorities. On the call, Durbin provided details on the passed budget resolution and suggested provisions in the upcoming reconciliation bill, including a Clean Electricity Payment Program (CEPP), which would pay utilities to produce more clean energy each year. Durbin and the environmental leaders went on to discuss the electric vehicle revolution taking place in Illinois and the proposed inclusion of the Clean Energy for America Act in the reconciliation bill to form the basis of clean energy tax provisions. Durbin also touched on his support for organized labor in the clean energy movement and formally protecting collective bargaining through the PRO Act.

“With Congress set to take up President Biden’s Build Back Better agenda in the coming months, we have a real opportunity to dedicate ourselves to instituting new forms of clean energy across industries,” said Durbin. “Illinois is fortunate to have engaged organizations leading the effort for a cleaner planet for future generations.”

Twitter

About

Dick Durbin

Source: Government page

Senator Dick Durbin, a Democrat from Springfield, is the 47th U.S. Senator from the State of Illinois, the state’s senior senator, and the convener of Illinois’ bipartisan congressional delegation.

Durbin also serves as the Democratic Whip, the second highest ranking position among the Senate Democrats. Senator Durbin has been elected to this leadership post by his Democratic colleagues every two years since 2005.

Elected to the U.S. Senate on November 5, 1996, and re-elected in 2002, 2008, and 2014, Durbin fills the seat left vacant by the retirement of his long-time friend and mentor, U.S. Senator Paul Simon.

Durbin sits on the Senate Judiciary, Appropriations, Agriculture, and Rules Committees. He is the Ranking Member of the Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Immigration and the Appropriations Committee’s Defense Subcommittee.

Senator Durbin makes approximately 50 round trips a year between Washington and Illinois. He is married to Loretta Schaefer Durbin. Their family consists of three children–Christine (deceased), Paul and Jennifer–as well as six grandchildren. They reside in Springfield.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Offices

Washington, D.C.

711 Hart Senate Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
p: 202.224.2152
f: 202.228.0400
9:00 am to 6:00 pm

Get Directions

Chicago

230 S. Dearborn Street
Suite 3892
Chicago, IL 60604
p: 312.353.4952
f: 312.353.0150
8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Get Directions

Springfield

525 S. 8th Street
Springfield, IL 62703
p: 217.492.4062
f: 217.492.4382
8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Get Directions

Carbondale

250 W. Cherry Street
Suite 115-D
Carbondale, IL 62901
p: 618.351.1122
f: 618.351.1124
8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Get Directions

Rock Island

1504 Third Avenue
Suite 227
Rock Island, IL 61201
p: 309.786.5173
f: 309.786.5404
8:30 am to 4:30 pm

Get Directions

 

Experience

Education

Contact

Email:

Offices

Washington, D.C
711 Hart Senate Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
Phone: 202.224.2152
Fax: 202.228.0400

Chicago
230 S. Dearborn Street
Suite 3892
Chicago, IL 60604
Phone: 312.353.4952
Fax: 312.353.0150

Springfield
525 S. 8th Street
Springfield, IL 62703
Phone: 217.492.4062
Fax: 217.492.4382

Carbondale
250 W. Cherry Street
Suite 115-D
Carbondale, IL 62901
Phone: 618.351.1122
Fax: 618.351.1124

Rock Island
1504 Third Avenue
Suite 227
Rock Island, IL 61201
Phone: 309.786.5173
Fax: 309.786.5404

Web

Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Government Page, Campaign Site, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Richard Joseph Durbin (born November 21, 1944) is an American lawyer and politician serving as the senior United States senator from Illinois, a seat he has held since 1997. He has been Senate Democratic Whip since 2005, the second-highest position in the Democratic leadership in the Senate, and Senate Majority Whip since 2021. He chairs the Senate Judiciary Committee.[1]

Durbin was born in East St. Louis, Illinois. He graduated from the School of Foreign Service and Georgetown University Law Center. Working in state legal counsel throughout the 1970s, he made an unsuccessful run for lieutenant governor of Illinois in 1978. Durbin was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1982, representing the Springfield-based 20th congressional district. He was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1996 and reelected in 2002, 2008, 2014 and 2020. Durbin has served as the Senate Democratic Whip since 2005, from 2007 to 2015, and in the 117th Congress serves as the Senate Majority Whip. He is the dean of Illinois’s congressional delegation.

Early life, education and career

Durbin was born in East St. Louis, Illinois, to an Irish-American father, William Durbin, and a Lithuanian-born mother, Anna (née Kutkin; Lithuanian: Ona Kutkaitė).[2] He graduated from Assumption High School in East St. Louis in 1962. During his high school years he worked at a meatpacking plant. He earned a B.S. from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in 1966. Durbin interned in Senator Paul Douglas‘s office during his senior year in college, and worked on Douglas’s unsuccessful 1966 reelection campaign. Durbin adopted the nickname “Dick”, which he did not previously use, after Douglas mistakenly called him by that name.[3]

Durbin earned his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center in 1969 and was admitted to the Illinois bar later that year. After graduating from law school, Durbin started a law practice in Springfield. He was legal counsel to Lieutenant Governor Paul Simon from 1969 to 1972, and then legal counsel to the Illinois State Senate Judiciary Committee from 1972 to 1982. Durbin was an unsuccessful Democratic candidate for the Illinois State Senate in 1976.[4] He ran for lieutenant governor in 1978 as the running mate of State Superintendent of Schools Michael Bakalis. They were defeated by Republican incumbents Jim Thompson and Dave O’Neal. Durbin then worked as an adjunct professor at the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine for five years while maintaining his law practice.

U.S. House of Representatives

In 1982, Durbin won the Democratic nomination for the now-eliminated 20th congressional district, which included Macon and most of Springfield. He scored a 1,400-vote victory, defeating 22-year incumbent Paul Findley, a U.S. Navy veteran, whose district lines had been substantially redrawn to remove rural farms and add economically depressed Macon, replacing 35% of the voters[5][6] and including more Democrats as part of the decennial redistricting. Durbin’s campaign emphasized unemployment and financial difficulties facing farmers, and told voters that electing him would send “a message to Washington and to President Reagan that our economic policies are not working.” Durbin benefited from donations by pro-Israel groups, especially AIPAC,[7] that opposed Findley’s advocacy on behalf of the Palestine Liberation Organization[8] in the year before the election. Durbin was reelected six times, rarely facing serious opposition, and winning more than 55% of the vote in each election except 1994.[9][10][11]

U.S. Senate

Official senate photo, 2004

Durbin speaks during the final night of the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado, introducing his party’s nominee, fellow Illinoisan Barack Obama

In 1996, Durbin defeated Pat Quinn to become the Democratic nominee to replace the retiring incumbent, Senator Paul Simon, a longtime friend. He faced Republican State Representative Al Salvi in the general election. Although the election had been expected to be competitive, Durbin benefited from Bill Clinton‘s 18-point win in Illinois that year and defeated Salvi by 15 points. He was reelected in 2002, 2008, 2014 and 2020, each time by at least 10 points.

Committees

Caucus memberships

Leadership

Durbin eating lunch with President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, and House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer.

In November 1998, Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle appointed Durbin Assistant Democratic Whip. After the 2004 election, Durbin became the Democratic Whip in the 109th Congress. He became the first senator from Illinois to serve as a Senate Whip since Everett Dirksen in the late 1950s, and the fifth to serve in Senate leadership.[15] Durbin served as Assistant Minority Leader from 2005 to 2007, when the Democrats became the majority party in the Senate. He then assumed the role of Assistant Majority Leader, or Majority Whip.

In addition to his caucus duties, Durbin chairs the Subcommittee on Human Rights and the Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government.[16]

In 2000, Democratic presidential nominee Al Gore reportedly considered asking Durbin to be his running mate for Vice President of the United States.[17] Gore ultimately chose Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman.[18]

When Majority Leader Harry Reid faced a difficult reelection fight in 2010, some pundits predicted a possibly heated fight to succeed him between Durbin and Senator Chuck Schumer, who is well known for his fund-raising prowess.[19] Reid’s reelection rendered such speculation moot. In 2021, Durbin became Senate Majority Whip again for the 117th Congress, as well as becoming chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee. This is the first time that the whip of either party has served as chair of this committee.

Political positions

Durbin and Bob Menendez with Venezuela‘s interim President Juan Guaidó in February 2020

Durbin is considered one of Congress’s most liberal members.[better source needed] Mother Jones has called him a “top Senate liberal.”[20] His voting record is very similar to the Democratic caucus position, consistent with his leadership position as Whip, which has the duty of persuading senators to follow the party line in their votes. As a trial lawyer, Durbin has excellent debating skills. Harry Reid called him “the best debater” in the U.S. Senate.[citation needed]

Durbin opposed Israel‘s plan to annex parts of the occupied Palestinian territories.[21]

The American Conservative Union gave him a 5% lifetime conservative rating in 2020.[22]

Abortion

As a congressman, Durbin voted consistently to uphold existing restrictions on abortion or impose new limitations, including supporting a Constitutional amendment that would have nullified Roe v. Wade.[23] He reversed his position in 1989 and has since voted to maintain access to abortion, including support for Medicaid funding of it, and opposed any limitation he considers a practical or potential encroachment upon Roe.[24] Durbin has maintained that this reversal came about due to personal reflection and his growing awareness of potentially harmful implications of his previous policy with respect to women facing dangerous pregnancies.[25] While visiting a home for abused children in Quincy, Illinois, the director, a friend, asked him to speak with two girls who were about to turn 18 and be turned out of state care. Talking with those girls, victims of gang rape and incest, made him reconsider his position on the subject. He says, “I still oppose abortion and would try my best to convince any woman in my family to carry the baby to term. But I believe that ultimately the decision must be made by the woman, her doctor, her family, and her conscience.”[26]

In September 2020, Durbin voted to confirm pro-life judges Stephen McGlynn and David Dugan to lifetime appointments to the federal judiciary in Illinois.[27]

Child care

In 2019, Durbin and 34 other senators introduced the Child Care for Working Families Act, a bill that was expected to create 770,000 new child care jobs and to ensure that families under 75% of the state median income would not pay for child care, with higher-earning families having to pay “their fair share for care on a sliding scale, regardless of the number of children they have.” The legislation also supported universal access to high-quality preschool programs for all three- and four-year-olds. The bill would have also changed the child care compensation and training to aid both teachers and caregivers.[28] It never made it out of committee.[29]

China

In April 2017, Durbin was one of eight Democratic senators to sign a letter to President Trump noting government-subsidized Chinese steel had been placed into the American market in recent years below cost and had hurt the domestic steel industry and the iron ore industry that fed it, calling on Trump to raise the steel issue with President of the People’s Republic of China Xi Jinping in his meeting with him.[30]

Criminal justice reform

In July 2017, Durbin, Cory Booker, Elizabeth Warren, and Kamala Harris introduced the Dignity for Incarcerated Women Act, legislation implementing a ban on the shackling of pregnant women and mandating the Bureau of Prisons to form superior visitation policies for parents along with providing parenting classes and health products such as tampons and pads. The bill also restricted prison employees from entering restrooms of the opposite sex except in pressing circumstances.[31]

In December 2018, Durbin voted for the First Step Act, legislation aimed at reducing recidivism rates among federal prisoners by expanding job training and other programs in addition to expanding early-release programs and modifying sentencing laws such as mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug offenders, “to more equitably punish drug offenders.”[32]

Darfur

On March 2, 2005, then-Senator Jon Corzine presented the Darfur Peace and Accountability Act (S. 495) to the Senate. Durbin was one of 40 senators to co-sponsor the bill. The bill asked all people involved in or deemed in some way responsible for the genocide in Darfur to be denied visas and entrance to the U.S.

In 2006, Durbin co-sponsored the Durbin-Leahy Amendment to the Supplemental Appropriations bill for emergency funding to instill peace in Darfur. In 2006, he also co-sponsored the Lieberman Resolution and the Clinton Amendment.

On June 7, 2007, Durbin introduced the , which was aimed “at enhancing the U.S. Government’s ability to impose penalties on violators of U.S. sanctions against Sudan.” The bill called for the U.N. Security Council to vote on sanctions against the Sudanese Government for the genocide in Darfur.

Durbin has voted for all Darfur-related legislation. In addition to the Darfur Peace and Accountability Act, he also supported the , the Hybrid Force Resolution, and the .

Myanmar

In October 2017, Durbin condemned the genocide of the Rohingya Muslim minority in Myanmar and called for a stronger response to it.[33]

Guantanamo Bay

In 2005, Durbin compared the U.S. treatment of prisoners at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base to the atrocities committed by “Nazis, Soviets in their gulags, or some mad regime—Pol Pot or others—that had no concern for human beings.” Demands that he apologize were initially rebuffed,[34] but Durbin later apologized to the military for remarks, which he said were “a very poor choice of words.”[35]

Gun law

Durbin received an “F” grade from the National Rifle Association for his consistent support for gun control.[36]

Durbin sent Attorney General Jeff Sessions a letter in May 2017 asking for support in expanding the Chicago Police Department‘s violence prevention programs by expanding access to the Strategic Decision Support Centers and the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network. He also asked the Justice Department to support the , which would stop illegal state-to-state gun trafficking.[37]

In response to mass shootings, such as the Orlando nightclub shooting and Las Vegas shooting, Durbin has repeatedly called for expanded gun control laws, saying that Congress would be “complicit” in the shooting deaths of people if it did not act.[38][39]

After the October 2017 Las Vegas shooting, Durbin was one of 24 senators to sign a letter to National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins espousing the view that it was critical the NIH “dedicate a portion of its resources to the public health consequences of gun violence” at a time when 93 Americans die per day from gun-related fatalities and noted that the Dickey Amendment did not prohibit objective, scientific inquiries into shooting death prevention.[40]

In January 2019, Durbin was one of 40 senators to introduce the , a bill that would require background checks for either the sale or transfer of all firearms including all unlicensed sellers. Exceptions to the bill’s background check requirement included transfers between members of law enforcement, loaning firearms for either hunting or sporting events temporarily, providing firearms as gifts to members of one’s immediate family, firearms transferred as part of an inheritance, or giving a firearm to another person temporarily for immediate self-defense.[41]

HIV/AIDS

In March 2007, Durbin introduced the of 2007 to the Senate. The bill was designed so that over three years, the U.S. would supply over $600 million to help create safer medical facilities and working conditions, and to recruit and train doctors from all over North America.

In December 2007, Durbin and two other senators co-sponsored Senator John Kerry‘s . In March 2007, he joined 32 other senators to co-sponsor the Early Treatment for HIV Act.

2001 Invasion of Afghanistan

Durbin voted to approve the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Terrorists. This act granted the executive broad military powers and was used to justify the 2001 U.S. invasion of Afghanistan and many later military interventions.[42]

Iraq War

On September 9, 2002, Durbin was the first of four Democratic senators (the others being Bob Graham, Feinstein, and Levin) on the Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI), responding to the Bush administration‘s request for a joint resolution authorizing a preemptive war on Iraq without having prepared a National Intelligence Estimate (NIE), to ask Central Intelligence Director George Tenet to prepare an NIE on the status of Iraq‘s Weapon of mass destruction programs.[43] Durbin was also one of few senators who read the resulting October 1, 2002, NIE, Iraq’s Continuing Programs for Weapons of Mass Destruction.[44]

On September 29, 2002, Durbin held a news conference in Chicago to announce that “absent dramatic changes” in the resolution, he would vote against the resolution authorizing war on Iraq.[45] On October 2, at the first high-profile Chicago anti-Iraq War rally in Federal Plaza, he repeated his promise to oppose the resolution in a letter read during the rally.[46]

On October 10, the U.S. Senate failed to pass Durbin’s amendment to the resolution to strike “the continuing threat posed by Iraq” and insert “an imminent threat posed by Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction”, by a 30–70 vote, with most Democratic senators voting for the amendment and 21 joining all 49 Republican senators voting against it.[47] On October 11, Durbin was one of 23 senators to vote against the joint resolution authorizing the Iraq War.[48]

On April 25, 2007, Durbin said that as an intelligence committee member he knew in 2002 from classified information that the Bush Administration was misleading the American people into a war on Iraq, but could not reveal this because, as an intelligence committee member, he was sworn to secrecy.[49] This revelation prompted an online attack ad against Durbin by the National Republican Senatorial Committee.[50]

Fair Sentencing Act

Durbin authored the Fair Sentencing Act of 2010, legislation that corrected some of the imbalance in cocaine sentencing.[51]

Immigration

Durbin is the chief proponent of the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act. The bill would provide certain students who entered or were brought to the nation illegally with the opportunity to earn conditional permanent residency if they arrived in the U.S. as children; graduated from a U.S. high school; have been in the country continuously for at least five years before the bill’s enactment; submit biometric data; pass a criminal background check; and complete two years toward a four-year degree from an accredited university or complete at least two years in the military within a five-year period. In 2013, the presented Durbin with the inaugural Nancy Pelosi Award for Immigration & Civil Rights Policy for his leadership on this issue.[52]

On January 28, 2013, Durbin was a member of a bipartisan group of eight senators, the Gang of Eight,[53] which announced principles for comprehensive immigration reform (CIR).[54]

In April 2018, Durbin was one of five senators to send acting director of ICE Thomas Homan a letter about standards the agency used to determine how to detain a pregnant woman, requesting that pregnant women not be held in custody except in extraordinary circumstances after reports “that ICE has failed to provide critical medical care to pregnant women in immigration detention—resulting in miscarriages and other negative health outcomes”.[55]

In July 2018, Durbin said Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen should resign over the Trump administration family separation policy. He argued it “is and was a cruel policy inconsistent with the bedrock values of the nation,” adding someone “in this administration has to accept responsibility.” , a DHS spokesman, replied on Twitter that “obstructionists in Congress should get to work”.[56]

In July 2019, after reports that the Trump administration intended to end protections of spouses, parents and children of active-duty service members from deportation, Durbin was one of 22 senators to sign a letter led by Tammy Duckworth arguing that the program allowed service members the ability “to fight for the United States overseas and not worry that their spouse, children, or parents will be deported while they are away” and that the program’s termination would cause personal hardship for service members in combat.[57]

In October 2019, Durbin blocked the passage of S.386, the Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act,[58] which aims to eliminate the per-country numerical limitation for all employment-based immigrants and to increase the per-country limitation for all family-sponsored immigrants from 7% to 15%.[59] He was one of the original co-sponsors of a similar bill, in the 112th Congress (2011-2012).[60] The only difference between the two versions is that S.1983 had the language “Includes nationals of Ireland coming to the United States under a treaty of commerce to perform specialty occupation services” in the nonimmigrant E-3 visa category.

Durbin speaks at a press conference in El Paso, TX with U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, along with Vice President Kamala Harris and Representative Veronica Escobar.

The Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank, argued, “The per country limits caused the backlog to develop unevenly. They result in an inequity between the proportion of applicants from certain countries and the proportion of green cards that nationals of those countries receive. The Indian backlog means that they carry almost the entire burden of the green card shortage. While they wait in line, nationals of other countries get to cut to the front of the line. Going forward, new EB2/EB3 applicants from India in 2019 will face astronomical wait times. At the current pace, it will take 49 years to process the Indian backlog—if people stick it out that long—and nearly 50,000 Indians would die before then. During that entire half century, other immigrants would keep bypassing Indians with almost no wait at all.”[61]

Durbin argued that bill S.386 would prioritize people of Indian and Chinese origin, who have been in the green card backlog for years, at the expense of future immigrants from other countries. After blocking S.386, Durbin proposed his own bill, which would almost triple the number of employment-based green cards and eliminate country caps.[62]

Durbin agreed that his bill would not pass in the current administration and promised for a bipartisan agreement to pass S.386.[63]

“The point is, it cannot pass. Not with Trump in office”, said Aman Kapoor, the leader of Immigration Voice, an activist group. “Indians need a solution now”, Kapoor said. “Every day, you see someone in the backlog is dying. Or kids are aging out. People are very stressed out because of the backlog.” Proponents of S.386 argue the bill will be a fair first-in-first-out system in place of the current discriminatory system that has resulted in a decades-long backlog of high-skilled immigrants who have already applied for a green card.[64] They also argue that basing employment green card allotment on an immutable characteristic like national origin goes against the spirit of Civil Rights Act of 1964, which outlaws national origin discrimination in employment, since national origin has no place in employment decisions. But opponents of the bill, mostly those who currently benefit from the birth-country reservation, argue that the discrimination argument is flawed, as getting a green card is not a protected right of any foreign worker. Opponents also argue that legislative proposals such as S.386 do not address the issue of too few employment-based green cards for an economy that has doubled in size since the law establishing their current statutory limits was passed in 1990. Opponents want to keep the per-country reservation in place in skilled immigration until visa numbers are increased.

Congressional Research Service (CRS) published a report stating that with the current immigration laws, the wait time for an Indian national of FY2020 would be 195 years, for a Chinese national 18 years, and for a national from any other country 0 years. Under amended S.386, the wait time for all applicants would be 37 years, regardless of their national origin by FY2030.[65] Increasing green card numbers, along with ending per-country limits on employment-based green cards would be an ideal solution.[66]

The immigrants in backlog frustrated by Durbin’s silence conducted several rallies, including a peaceful rally on July 4.[67] On August 31, 2020, he released his hold and agreed to pass the bill with unanimous consent. But Senator Rick Scott blocked the bill, seeking an 18,000 green-card reservation for people from certain countries.

Tobacco regulation

In 1987, Durbin introduced major tobacco regulation legislation in the House. The bill banned cigarette smoking on airline flights of two hours or less. Representative C. W. Bill Young joined him in saying that the rights of smokers to smoke ends where their smoking affects other people’s health and safety, such as on airplanes. The bill passed as part of the 1988 transportation spending bill. In 1989, Congress banned cigarette smoking on all domestic airline flights.[68]

In March 1994, Durbin proposed an amendment to the Improving America’s Schools Act that required schools receiving federal drug prevention money to teach elementary and secondary students about the dangers of tobacco, drugs, and alcohol. The amendment also required schools to warn students about tobacco and teach them how to resist peer pressure to smoke.[69]

In February 2008, Durbin called on Congress to support a measure that would allow the Food and Drug Administration to oversee the tobacco industry. The measure would require companies to disclose the contents of tobacco products, restrict advertising and promotions, and mandate the removal of harmful ingredients from tobacco products. It would also prohibit tobacco companies from using terms like “low risk,” “light,” and “mild” on the packaging.

Durbin attributes his stance against tobacco smoking to his father, who smoked two packs of cigarettes a day and died of lung cancer.

Russia

Durbin spearheaded a nonbinding resolution in July 2018 “warning President Trump not to let the Russian government question diplomats and other officials”. The resolution states the U.S. “should refuse to make available any current or former diplomat, civil servant, political appointee, law enforcement official or member of the Armed Forces of the United States for questioning by the government of Vladimir Putin“. It passed 98–0.[70]

In December 2018, after United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced the Trump administration was suspending its obligations in the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty in 60 days if Russia continued to violate the treaty, Durbin was one of 26 senators to sign a letter expressing concern over the administration “now abandoning generations of bipartisan U.S. leadership around the paired goals of reducing the global role and number of nuclear weapons and ensuring strategic stability with America’s nuclear-armed adversaries” and calling on Trump to continue arms negotiations.[71]

Freedom of expression

In 2007, speaking as Senate Majority Whip, Durbin said on record that “It’s time to reinstitute the Fairness Doctrine.”[72]

In 2010, Durbin cosponsored and passed from committee the Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act, a bill to combat media piracy by blacklisting websites. Many opposed to the bill argue that it violates First Amendment rights and promotes censorship.[73][74] The announcement of the bill was followed by a wave of protest from digital rights activists, including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, calling it censorship and stating that action could be taken against all users of sites on which only some users are uploading infringing material.[75]

Durbin was a sponsor of the PROTECT IP Act.[76]

Financial crisis of 2007–2010

Durbin meeting with Raj Date, then Acting Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, to discuss helping consumers compare bank fees

On April 27, 2009, in an interview with WJJG talk radio host Ray Hanania, Durbin accused banks of creating the financial crisis of 2007–2010. Durbin expressed a belief that many of the banks responsible for creating the crisis “own the place”, referring to the power wielded by the banking lobby on Capitol Hill.[77]

On September 18, 2008, Durbin attended a closed meeting with congressional leaders, then-Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson and Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, and was urged to craft legislation to help financially troubled banks. That same day (trade effective the next day), Durbin sold mutual fund shares worth $42,696 and reinvested it all with Warren Buffett.[78]

On February 26, 2009, Durbin introduced the of 2009, calling for a maximum annual interest rate cap of 36%, including all interest and fees.[79] The bill was intended to put an end to predatory lending activities.

Rod Blagojevich

Shortly after Governor Rod Blagojevich‘s arrest on federal corruption charges on December 9, 2008, Durbin called for the Illinois legislature to quickly pass legislation for a special election to fill then-President-elect Barack Obama‘s vacant Senate seat.[80] He stated that no United States Senate appointment of Blagojevich’s could produce a credible replacement.[81]

Durbin and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid led all 50 members of the Senate Democratic Caucus in writing Blagojevich to urge him to resign and not name a successor to Obama following Blagojevich’s arrest.[82]

Trade

In January 2005, Durbin changed his longstanding position on sugar tariffs and price supports. After several years of voting to keep sugar quotas and price supports, he now favors abolishing the program. “The sugar program depended on congressmen like me from states that grew corn”, Durbin said, referring to the fact that, though they were formerly a single entity, the sugar market and the corn syrup market are now largely separate.[83]

In May 2006, Durbin campaigned to maintain a $0.54 per gallon tariff on imported ethanol. He justified the tariff by joining Barack Obama in stating that “ethanol imports are neither necessary nor a practical response to current gasoline prices”, arguing instead that domestic ethanol production is sufficient and expanding.[84] The gave him a rating of 100%.[citation needed]

American Airlines praised Durbin for arguing for the need to lower rising oil prices.[85]

Environment

Among Durbin’s legislative causes are environmental protection, particularly the protection of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The League of Conservation Voters gives him a rating of 89%. Sierra Club gives him a 90% rating.[citation needed]

Other positions

Durbin meets with Elena Kagan

Durbin has also been a major proponent of expanded Amtrak funding and support. In October 2007, he opposed a bill in the Illinois General Assembly that would allow three casinos to be built, saying, “I really, really think we ought to stop and catch our breath and say, ‘Is this the future of Illinois? That every time we want to do something we’ll just build more casinos?’”[86]

Durbin reintroduced the Fair Elections Now Act during the 112th Congress. The bill would provide public funds to candidates who do not take political donations larger than $100 from any donor.[87]

In April 2013, Durbin chaired a hearing in the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Human Rights about the moral, legal and constitutional issues surrounding targeted killings and the use of drones. Durbin said, “Many in the national security community are concerned that we may undermine our counterterrorism efforts if we do not carefully measure the benefits and costs of targeted killing.”[88]

In August 2013, Durbin was one of 23 Democratic senators to sign a letter to the Defense Department warning of some payday lenders “offering predatory loan products to service members at exorbitant triple-digit effective interest rates and loan products that do not include the additional protections envisioned by the law” and asserting that service members and their families “deserve the strongest possible protections and swift action to ensure that all forms of credit offered to members of our armed forces are safe and sound.”[89]

In June 2015, Durbin sent Ukraine prime minister Arseniy Yatsinuk a letter fully supporting him.[citation needed]

In March 2018, Durbin was one of 10 senators to sign a letter spearheaded by Jeff Merkley lambasting a proposal by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai that would curb the scope of benefits from the Lifeline program during a period when roughly 6.5 million people in poor communities relied on Lifeline to receive access to high-speed internet, arguing that it was Pai’s “obligation to the American public, as the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, to improve the Lifeline program and ensure that more Americans can afford access, and have means of access, to broadband and phone service.” The senators also advocated insuring that “Lifeline reaches more Americans in need of access to communication services.”[90]

In March 2019, Durbin was one of 10 Democratic senators to sign a letter to Salman of Saudi Arabia requesting the release of human rights lawyer Waleed Abu al-Khair and writer Raif Badawi, women’s rights activists Loujain al-Hathloul and Samar Badawi, and Dr. Walid Fitaih. The senators wrote, “Not only have reputable international organizations detailed the arbitrary detention of peaceful activists and dissidents without trial for long periods, but the systematic discrimination against women, religious minorities and mistreatment of migrant workers and others has also been well-documented.”[91]

In April 2019, Durbin was one of 34 senators to sign a letter to Trump encouraging him “to listen to members of your own Administration and reverse a decision that will damage our national security and aggravate conditions inside Central America”, asserting that Trump had “consistently expressed a flawed understanding of U.S. foreign assistance” since becoming president and that he was “personally undermining efforts to promote U.S. national security and economic prosperity” by preventing the use of Fiscal Year 2018 national security funding. The senators argued that foreign assistance to Central American countries created less migration to the U.S. by helping to improve conditions in those countries.[92]

In April 2019, Durbin was one of six senators to send CFPB director Kathy Kraninger a letter expressing concern that “CFPB leadership has abandoned its supervision and enforcement activities related to federal student loan servicers” and opining that such behavior displayed “a shocking disregard for the financial well-being of our nation’s public servants, including teachers, first responders, and members of the military.” The senators requested that Kraninger clarify the CFPB’s role in overseeing the Public Service Loan Forgiveness’s student loan servicers handling since December 2017, such as examinations.[93]

In April 2019, Durbin was one of 41 senators to sign a bipartisan letter to the housing subcommittee praising the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Section 4 Capacity Building program as authorizing “HUD to partner with national nonprofit community development organizations to provide education, training, and financial support to local community development corporations (CDCs) across the country” and expressing disappointment that Trump’s budget “has slated this program for elimination after decades of successful economic and community development.” The senators wrote of their hope that the subcommittee would support continued funding for Section 4 in Fiscal Year 2020.[94]

In June 2019, Durbin was one of 15 senators to introduce the , legislation intended to promote transparency by mandating that pharmaceutical companies disclose the amount of money going toward research and development in addition to both marketing and executives’ salaries. The bill also abolished the restriction that stopped the federal Medicare program from using its buying power to negotiate lower drug prices for beneficiaries and hinder drug company monopoly practices used to keep prices high and disable less expensive generics entering the market.[95]

In August 2019, Durbin, three other Senate Democrats, and Bernie Sanders signed a letter to Acting FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless in response to Novartis falsifying data as part of an attempt to gain the FDA’s approval for its new gene therapy Zolgensma, writing that it was “unconscionable that a drug company would provide manipulated data to federal regulators in order to rush its product to market, reap federal perks, and charge the highest amount in American history for its medication.”[96]

Durbin was participating in the 2021 United States Electoral College vote count when pro-Trump rioters stormed the U.S. Capitol. Along with other senators and staff, Durbin ran out of the Senate Chamber after the attackers, whom he called “extremists”, breached the Capitol. He then evacuated to a secure location with Pelosi, McConnell and Schumer.[97] Durbin blamed Trump for the attack. He also said Senator Josh Hawley was partially responsible for the storming. He called for Trump’s removal through the invocation of the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution or impeachment.[98]

Guantanamo interrogation criticism

Durbin received media attention on June 14, 2005, when in the U.S. Senate chambers he compared interrogation techniques used at Camp X-Ray, Guantanamo Bay, as reported by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, to those utilized by such regimes as Nazi Germany, the Soviet Union, and the Khmer Rouge:

When you read some of the graphic descriptions of what has occurred here – I almost hesitate to put them in the record, and yet they have to be added to this debate. Let me read to you what one FBI agent saw. And I quote from his report:

On a couple of occasions, I entered interview rooms to find a detainee chained hand and foot in a fetal position to the floor, with no chair, food or water. Most times they urinated or defecated on themselves, and had been left there for 18–24 hours or more. On one occasion, the air conditioning had been turned down so far and the temperature was so cold in the room, that the barefooted detainee was shaking with cold…. On another occasion, the [air conditioner] had been turned off, making the temperature in the unventilated room well over 100 degrees. The detainee was almost unconscious on the floor, with a pile of hair next to him. He had apparently been literally pulling his hair out throughout the night. On another occasion, not only was the temperature unbearably hot, but extremely loud rap music was being played in the room, and had been since the day before, with the detainee chained hand and foot in the fetal position on the tile floor.

If I read this to you and did not tell you that it was an FBI agent describing what Americans had done to prisoners in their control, you would most certainly believe this must have been done by Nazis, Soviets in their gulags, or some mad regime – Pol Pot or others – that had no concern for human beings. Sadly, that is not the case. This was the action of Americans in the treatment of their prisoners.[99]

Durbin’s comments drew widespread criticism that comparing U.S. actions to such regimes insulted the United States and victims of genocide. Radio host Rush Limbaugh and White House deputy chief of staff Karl Rove accused him of treason,[100] while former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich called on the Senate to censure him.[101] Chicago Mayor Richard Daley, whose son Patrick was serving in U.S. Army, also called on Durbin to apologize for his remarks, saying that he thought it was a “disgrace to say that any man or woman in the military would act like that.”[102] John Wertheim, Democratic state party chairman of New Mexico, and Jim Pederson, Arizona Democratic party chairman, also criticized Durbin’s remarks.[103] The leader of the Veterans of Foreign Wars also demanded an apology,[104] as did the Anti-Defamation League[102]

Durbin initially did not apologize, but on June 21, 2005, he went before the Senate, saying, “More than most people, a senator lives by his words … occasionally words fail us, occasionally we will fail words.”[105]

Former The New Republic editor Andrew Sullivan praised Durbin for raising serious moral issues about U.S. policy.[106] Other commentators, including commentator Markos Moulitsas Zúniga of Daily Kos, condemned Durbin for apologizing to his critics, arguing he made a mistake in making himself, rather than detention and torture concerns at Guantanamo Bay, the focus of media coverage.[107][108]

Attempts to remove PAC radio advertisements

In July 2014, Americas PAC, a Political Action Committee designed to elect conservative Republicans, released a radio advertisement attacking Durbin’s staff salaries.[109] This was based on a Washington Times article that stated Durbin’s female staff members made $11,000 less annually than his male staffers.[110] In response, lawyers representing Durbin submitted a letter claiming the information in the ad was false and that the radio stations would be liable for airing the ad, with the possibility of losing their FCC license.[111] The radio station stated the sources provided to back up the information provided by Americas PAC were checked and verified and that they would keep the ad on air.[112]

Electoral history

1976 Illinois 50th Senate district – Primary Election (2-year term) (3/16/76)[113][114]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin 12,930 41.68
DemocraticJoseph Londrigan7,03622.68
DemocraticGary Tumulty11,05535.63
DemocraticWrite-Ins30
Total votes31,024 100.0
1976 Illinois’s 50th Senate district election[115]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican John Davidson (incumbent) 48,760 50.86
DemocraticDick Durbin47,11249.14
Total votes95,872 100.0
1978 Illinois primary election – Lt. Governor (3/21/78) [116]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (unopposed) 528,819 100
DemocraticWrite-Ins50
Total votes528,824 100.0
1978 Illinois gubernatorial general election (11/7/78) [117]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanJames R. Thompson (incumbent)
David C. O’Neal (incumbent)
1,859,68459.04
DemocraticMichael Bakalis
Dick Durbin
1,263,13440.10
LibertarianGeorgia Shields11,4200.36
Socialist WorkersCecil Lampkin11,0260.35
U.S. LaborMelvin Klenetsky4,7370.15
Write-inOthers1060.00
Total votes3,150,107
1982 Illinois’s 20th congressional district election – Democratic primary[118]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin 33,956 75.33
DemocraticJohn L. Knuppel11,11924.67
Total votes45,075 100.0
1982 Illinois’s 20th congressional district election[119]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin 100,758 50.35
RepublicanPaul Findley (incumbent)99,34849.65
Write-in votesWrite-in30.00
Total votes200,109 100.0
1984 Illinois’s 20th congressional district election – Democratic primary[118]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 53,588 92.47
DemocraticLouis K. Widmar4,3637.53
Total votes57,951 100.0
1984 Illinois’s 20th congressional district election[120]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 145,092 61.23
RepublicanRichard G. Austin91,72838.73
N/AOther10.00
Total votes236,821 100.0
1986 Illinois’s 20th congressional district election[119]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 126,556 68.10
RepublicanKevin B. McCarthy59,29131.90
Total votes185,847 100.0
1988 Illinois’s 20th congressional district election[121]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 153,341 68.87
RepublicanPaul E. Jurgens69,30331.13
Total votes222,644 100.0
1990 Illinois’s 20th congressional district election[122]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 130,114 66.20
RepublicanPaul Jurgens66,43333.80
Total votes196,547 100.0
1992 Illinois’s 20th congressional district election[123]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 154,869 56.50
RepublicanJohn M. Shimkus119,21943.50
Total votes274,088 100.0
1994 Illinois’s 20th congressional district election – Democratic primary[118]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 46,248 99.97
DemocraticDonald Wm. Owens (write-in)140.03
Total votes46,262 100.0
1994 Illinois’s 20th congressional district election[119]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 108,034 54.84
RepublicanBill Owens88,96445.16
Total votes196,998 100.0
1996 United States Senate election in Illinois – Democratic primary[118]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin 512,520 64.87
DemocraticPat Quinn233,13829.50
DemocraticRonald F. Gibbs17,6812.23
DemocraticJ. Ahmad17,2112.17
DemocraticPaul Park9,5051.20
Total votes790,055 100.0
1996 United States Senate election in Illinois[124]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin 2,341,744 54.32
RepublicanAl Salvi1,728,82440.10
ReformSteven H. Perry61,0231.42
LibertarianRobin J. Miller41,2180.96
ConstitutionChad Koppie17,5630.41
Natural LawJames E. Davis13,8380.32
Write-in votesWrite-in4,2280.10
Total votes4,311,391 100.0
2002 United States Senate election in Illinois[125]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 2,103,766 60.33
RepublicanJim Durkin1,325,70338.02
LibertarianSteven Burgauer57,3821.65
Total votes3,486,851 100.0
2008 United States Senate election in Illinois[126]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 3,615,844 67.84
RepublicanSteve Sauerberg1,520,62128.53
GreenKathy Cummings119,1352.24
LibertarianLarry A. Stafford50,2240.94
ConstitutionChad N. Koppie24,0590.45
Write-in votesPatricia Elaine Beard10.00
Total votes5,329,884 100.0
2014 United States Senate election in Illinois[127]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 1,929,637 53.55
RepublicanJim Oberweis1,538,52242.69
LibertarianSharon Hansen135,3163.76
Write-in votesRoger K. Davis310.00
Write-in votesHilaire F. Shioura120.00
Write-in votesSherry Procarione10.00
Total votes3,603,519 100.0
2020 United States Senate election in Illinois[128]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Dick Durbin (incumbent) 3,278,930 54.93
RepublicanMark Curran2,319,87038.87
Willie Wilson PartyWillie Wilson237,6993.98
LibertarianDanny Malouf75,6731.27
GreenDavid Black55,7110.95
Write-in180.00
Total votes5,968,901 100.0

Personal life

Family

Durbin and his wife Loretta have had three children, Christine, Jennifer and Paul. After several weeks in the hospital with complications due to a congenital heart condition, Christine died on November 1, 2008.[129]

Conflict of interest issues

Durbin’s wife was a lobbyist, and it was reported by the Chicago Tribune in 2014 that some of her “clients have received federal funding promoted by [Durbin]”.[130] In addition to announcing the award of monies to ten clients of his wife’s lobbying firm, these conflicts included her lobbying firm receiving a one-year contract with a housing nonprofit group around the time Durbin went to bat for the organization; a state university receiving funds through an earmark by Durbin when his wife was its lobbyist; and Durbin arranging federal money for a public health nonprofit when his wife was seeking state support for the same group.[130][35] The Durbins maintain that they try to avoid conflicts of interest.[130]

Religion

Durbin is Roman Catholic. In 2004, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield in Illinois barred him from receiving communion because he voted against the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act. The current bishop of the Diocese said Durbin stays away from his Springfield parish because “he doesn’t want to make a scene”.[131] Durbin responded to the communion ban in 2004 that he is accountable to his constituents, even if it means defying Church teachings.[132] In 2018, Bishop Thomas John Paprocki affirmed the decision to deny Durbin communion in the Springfield Diocese after Durbin’s vote against the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act.

In 2017, Durbin was criticized for requesting a clarification from then Court of Appeals nominee Amy Coney Barrett during her Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing about her self-descriptive terminology “orthodox Catholic.” He contended that might unfairly characterize Catholics who may not agree with the church’s positions about abortion or the death penalty. She contended, “litigants and the general public are entitled to impartial justice, and that may be something that a judge who is heedful of ecclesiastical pronouncements cannot dispense.” Barrett opined that judges aren’t bound by precedent conflicting with the Constitution.[133] She wrote that judges could recuse themselves from hearing matters if their faith conflicted with issues to be decided in cases they might otherwise hear.[134] An article in the National Review contended, “Senators must inquire about these issues when considering lifetime appointments because ensuring impartiality and fidelity to precedent are critical for the rule of law.”[133][135] The issue prompted questions regarding the application of Article VI, Section 3 of the Constitution, which mandates: “No religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States.”[136]

Film and television appearances

Film
YearTitleRoleNotes
2010Pricele$$[137]HimselfDocumentary
2015The Gettysburg Address[138]HimselfDocumentary

See also

References

  1. ^ DeBonis, Mike; Kane, Paul. “Senate Democrats clear the way for Durbin to be party’s leader on Judiciary Committee”. The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  2. ^ “durbin”. Freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com. November 21, 1944. Archived from the original on February 2, 2008. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  3. ^ Axelrod, David (January 18, 2016). “Ep. 24 – Sen. Dick Durbin”. The Axe Files with David Axelrod (Podcast). CNN. Retrieved April 24, 2021.
  4. ^ “Senator Dick Durbin – Biography – Project Vote Smart”. Votesmart.org. November 21, 1944. Retrieved September 15, 2012.
  5. ^ Bohlen, Celestine (October 31, 1982). “THE 1982 ELECTIONS: THE ILLINOIS 20TH DISTRICT RACE”. The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  6. ^ “redistricting and Reaganomics Feb 1983”. lib.niu.edu. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  7. ^ The Israel Lobby, p. 157, by John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt
  8. ^ Lake, Eli; Rogin, Josh. “How Obama Out-Muscled Aipac”. Bloomberg.com. Retrieved August 31, 2016.
  9. ^ Malcolm, Andrew (September 5, 1982). “The Midwest”. The New York Times. Retrieved February 1, 2012.
  10. ^ Clymer, Adam (October 3, 1982). “Democrats Shaping Election as Referendum on Economy”. The New York Times. Retrieved February 1, 2012.
  11. ^ Clymer, Adam (October 30, 1982). “GOP House Candidates Leading in Fundraising”. The New York Times. Retrieved February 1, 2012.
  12. ^ “Portman and Durbin Launch Senate Ukraine Caucus”. Rob Portman United States Senator for Ohio. February 9, 2015. Archived from the original on February 11, 2015. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  13. ^ “Members”. Afterschool Alliance. Retrieved April 17, 2018.
  14. ^ “Members”. Congressional NextGen 9-1-1 Caucus. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved June 8, 2018.
  15. ^ “February 14, 2005 – The Nation”. archive.is. September 12, 2012. Archived from the original on September 12, 2012.
  16. ^ “Dick Durbin’s Biography – The Voter’s Self Defense System”. Vote Smart. November 21, 1944. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  17. ^ “Durbin Off The VP List; Indiana’s Bayh Still On”. Chicago Tribune. August 4, 2000. Retrieved September 16, 2020.
  18. ^ “CNN Transcript – Inside Politics: Joseph Lieberman Accepts Al Gore’s Offer to Join the Democratic Ticket – August 8, 2000”. Transcripts.cnn.com. August 8, 2000. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  19. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on November 13, 2013. Retrieved February 5, 2011.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  20. ^ Khimm, Suzy (December 8, 2010) Top Senate Liberal Defends Obama on Tax Cuts, Mother Jones
  21. ^ “Democratic Senators Release Resolution Against Israeli Annexation of West Bank”. Haaretz. July 7, 2020.
  22. ^ “Lawmakers”.
  23. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on September 13, 2006. Retrieved August 4, 2006.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  24. ^ “Richard Durbin on Abortion”. Massscorecard.org. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  25. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on September 14, 2006. Retrieved August 4, 2006.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  26. ^ Parsons, Christi (December 2, 2007). “Dick Durbin’s Challenge”. Chicago Tribune. pp. 15–19, 26–27.
  27. ^ “Illinois senators split on judge votes, exposing division”. Roll Call.
  28. ^ “U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin Helps Introduce Legislation to Ensure Child Care for All”. urbanmilwaukee.com. March 1, 2019.
  29. ^ Murray, Patty (February 26, 2019). “S.568 – 116th Congress (2019-2020): Child Care for Working Families Act”. www.congress.gov.
  30. ^ Myers, John (April 6, 2017). “Klobuchar, Franken among senators asking Trump to press China on steel”. twincities.com.
  31. ^ Wheeler, Lydia (July 18, 2017). “Kamala Harris slams Sessions on criminal justice”. The Hill.
  32. ^ Fandos, Nicholas (December 18, 2018). “Senate Passes Bipartisan Criminal Justice Bill”. The New York Times.
  33. ^ “Sen. Todd Young urges action to end Muslim genocide in Myanmar”. IndyStar. October 22, 2017. Retrieved March 5, 2019.
  34. ^ “US senator stands by Nazi remark”. aljazeera.com. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  35. ^ a b Janssen, Kim; Berlin, Jonathon. “Durbin’s history of scrapes”. chicagotribune.com. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  36. ^ “The Voter’s Self Defense System”. Vote Smart. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  37. ^ Gossett, Stephen. “Sen. Durbin Asks DOJ For Help Curbing Chicago Gun Violence Ahead Of Summer”. Chicagoist. Archived from the original on November 4, 2017. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  38. ^ Savransky, Rebecca (June 12, 2016). “Durbin calls for Congress to pass gun control laws”. TheHill. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  39. ^ “Morning Spin: Illinois Democrats talk gun control after Las Vegas shooting; Trump’s office talks Chicago”. Chicago Tribune. October 3, 2017. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  40. ^ Weizel, Nathaniel (October 11, 2017). “Senate Dems urge NIH to renew gun research grants”. The Hill.
  41. ^ “U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin Helps Introduce Background Check Expansion Act To Reduce Gun Violence”. urbanmilwaukee.com. January 9, 2019.
  42. ^ “U.S. Senate: U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 107th Congress – 1st Session”. senate.gov.
  43. ^ Select Committee on Intelligence (July 9, 2004). “Report on the U.S. Intelligence Community’s Prewar Intelligence Assessments on Iraq” (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on August 30, 2006.Durbin, Richard (September 10, 2002). “Assessing Iraq’s military capabilities”. Congressional Record–Senate. pp. S8427–S8429.Sweet, Lynn (September 11, 2002). “U.S. lacks Iraq analysis: Durbin” (paid archive). Chicago Sun-Times. p. 5.
  44. ^ Windrem, Bob; Murray, Mark (May 25, 2007). “Hillary and the 2002 NIE”. msnbc.com. Archived from the original on December 8, 2007.“Records: Senators who OK’d war didn’t read key report”. cnn.com. May 29, 2007.Raju, Manu; Schor, Elana; Wurman, Ilan (June 19, 2007). “Few senators read Iraq NIE report”. The Hill.
  45. ^ Dorning, Mike; Chase, John (September 30, 2002). “Durbin opposes Bush war resolution” (paid archive). Chicago Tribune. p. 1 (Metro).
  46. ^ Glauber, Bill (October 3, 2002). “War protesters gentler, but passion still burns” (paid archive). Chicago Tribune. p. 1.Strausberg, Chinta (October 3, 2002). “War with Iraq undermines U.N.” Chicago Defender. p. 1. Archived from the original (paid archive) on October 14, 2009. Retrieved March 17, 2008.Bryant, Greg (October 2, 2002). “300 protesters rally to oppose war with Iraq”. Medill News Service.[permanent dead link]Katz, Marilyn (October 2, 2007). “Five Years Since Our First Action”. Chicagoans Against War & Injustice. Archived from the original on July 21, 2011.
  47. ^ U.S. Senate (October 10, 2002). “Roll call vote No. 236 on the Durbin Amendment No. 4865”.Sweet, Lynn (October 11, 2002). “Durbin loses bid to limit authority” (paid archive). Chicago Sun-Times. p. 7.
  48. ^ U.S. Senate (October 11, 2002). “Roll call vote No. 237 on H.J.Res. 114”.Goldberg, Michelle (November 11, 2002). “Wellstone was right”. Salon.com. Archived from the original on September 21, 2007.
  49. ^ Durbin, Richard (April 25, 2007). “Iraq Supplemental Appropriations Bill”. Congressional Record–Senate. pp. S5026–S5028.Lengell, Sean (April 27, 2007). “Durbin kept silent on prewar knowledge” (paid archive). The Washington Times. p. A1.Oberman, Keith (April 27, 2007). “5. Changing Tenets”. Countdown with Keith Olbermann. msnbc.com. Archived from the original on May 18, 2008.SilentPatriot (April 28, 2007). “Sen. Durbin drops bombshells on the Senate floor”. Crooks and Liars. Archived from the original on June 18, 2008.
  50. ^ Krol, Eric (May 3, 2007). “GOP goes after Durbin with online ad” (paid archive). Daily Herald. p. 10.Byrne, Dennis (May 7, 2007). “Oath upheld, but at what cost?” (paid archive). Chicago Tribune. p. 21.
  51. ^ “Fair Sentencing Act of 2010” Archived March 3, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, Families Against Mandatory Minimums, Famm.org, accessed September 30, 2010.
  52. ^ “23rd Phillip Burton Immigration & Civil Rights Awards | Immigrant Legal Resource Center”. ILRC. May 31, 2013. Archived from the original on June 25, 2013. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  53. ^ “Immigration and the DREAM Act | U.S. Senator Dick Durbin of Illinois”. durbin.senate.gov. Retrieved March 21, 2019.
  54. ^ “Senators Reach a Bipartisan Agreement for Comprehensive Immigration Reform”. The National Law Review. Fowler White Boggs P.A. January 31, 2013. Retrieved February 1, 2013.
  55. ^ Bowden, John (April 5, 2018). “Democrats question ICE standards for detaining pregnant women”. The Hill.
  56. ^ Weixel, Nathaniel. “Top Senate Dem calls on DHS secretary to resign over family separations”. The Hill. Retrieved August 1, 2018.
  57. ^ Domingo, Ida (July 11, 2019). “Senate Democrats to Trump: don’t deport military families”. WSET. Retrieved February 11, 2020.
  58. ^ “Will the Congress Yield – for Immigration Reform?”. The National Law Review. Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  59. ^ Lee, Mike (July 9, 2019). “S.386 – 116th Congress (2019-2020): Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019”. congress.gov. Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  60. ^ Lee, Mike (July 9, 2019). “S.386 – 116th Congress (2019-2020): Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2019”. www.congress.gov.
  61. ^ “Fairness for High Skilled Immigrants Act: Wait Times and Green Card Grants”. Cato Institute. September 30, 2019.
  62. ^ Durbin, Richard J. (October 16, 2019). “S.2603 – 116th Congress (2019-2020): Resolving Extended Limbo for Immigrant Employees and Families Act”. www.congress.gov.
  63. ^ “Durbin Announces Bipartisan Agreement to Help Immigrant Workers Stuck in the Green Card Backlog – YouTube”. www.youtube.com.
  64. ^ Anderson, Stuart. “Bill Aims To End Decades-Long Waits For High-Skilled Immigrants”. Forbes. Retrieved October 31, 2019.
  65. ^ Kandel, William A. (March 26, 2020). “The Employment-Based ImmigrationBacklog”. Congressional Research Service. Retrieved October 28, 2020.
  66. ^ Hauslohner, Abigail. “The employment green card backlog tops 800,000, most of them Indian. A solution is elusive” – via www.washingtonpost.com.
  67. ^ Dorner, Sydney (July 4, 2020). “Illinois Immigrants March for Reform”. newchannel20.com. Retrieved October 28, 2020. SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (WICS/WRSP) — On a day where most people are celebrating the country’s Independence, many immigrants here in Springfield are asking for citizenship. Immigrants organized a Freedom March on Saturday with the key goal of getting Senator Dick Durbin, D-Illinois, to help pass a bill that would make receiving employment-based green cards a first-come first-served system.
  68. ^ “House Passes Ban on Smoking on Flights of 2 Hours or Less”. The New York Times. Associated Press. July 15, 1987.
  69. ^ Seelye, Katharine (March 23, 1994). “Congress Considers Smoking Ban in Schools”. The New York Times.
  70. ^ Carney, Jordain. “Senate approves resolution warning Trump not to hand over US officials”. The Hill. Retrieved July 22, 2018.
  71. ^ Mitchell, Ellen (December 13, 2018). “Senate Dems urge Trump to continue nuclear arms control negotiations after treaty suspension”. The Hill.
  72. ^ “News Archive”. TheHill. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  73. ^ Leahy, Patrick. “Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (2010; 111th Congress S. 3804)”. GovTrack.us. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  74. ^ “The 19 Senators Who Voted To Censor The Internet”. Techdirt. November 18, 2010. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  75. ^ “Censorship of the Internet Takes Center Stage in “Online Infringement” Bill”. eff.org. September 21, 2010. Retrieved October 16, 2010.
  76. ^ “Cosponsors: S.968 — 112th Congress (2011-2012)”. Congress.gov. Retrieved June 27, 2017.
  77. ^ Grim, Ryan (April 29, 2009). “Dick Durbin: Banks “Frankly Own The Place. The Huffington Post. Retrieved June 6, 2009.
  78. ^ “Durbin Invests With Buffett After Funds Sale Amid Market Plunge” June 13, 2008,“Archived copy”. Archived from the original on September 20, 2008. Retrieved September 14, 2008.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link). Retrieved September 14, 2008.
  79. ^ “S. 500: Protecting Consumers from Unreasonable Credit Rates Act of 2009”. Govtrack.us. February 26, 2009. Retrieved March 26, 2009.
  80. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on December 14, 2008. Retrieved December 14, 2008.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  81. ^ “Durbin urges special election to succeed Obama”. Usatoday.Com. December 10, 2008. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  82. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on February 15, 2011. Retrieved December 14, 2008.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  83. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on April 30, 2006. Retrieved April 25, 2006.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  84. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on June 1, 2006. Retrieved January 21, 2007.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  85. ^ “American Airlines Praises Congressional Effort to Enhance Accountability in the Oil Markets”. American Airlines. Retrieved October 30, 2014.
  86. ^ “Durbin Cautions State on Casino Plan”. WBEZ. October 8, 2007. Archived from the original on February 8, 2009. Retrieved November 9, 2008.
  87. ^ “Fair Elections Now”. Common Cause. Archived from the original on April 27, 2014. Retrieved April 27, 2014.
  88. ^ Koenig, Robert (May 1, 2013). “Drone wars: Do ‘targeted killings’ undermine ‘hearts and minds’ counterterrorism efforts?”. St. Louis Beacon. Archived from the original on July 20, 2013.
  89. ^ Cox, Ramsey (August 15, 2013). “Senate Dems ask DOD to protect service members from predatory lenders”. The Hill.
  90. ^ Breland, Ali (March 29, 2018). “Dems slam FCC head for proposed limits to low-income internet program”. The Hill.
  91. ^ Budryk, Zack (March 19, 2019). “Senate Dems petition Saudi king to release dissidents, US citizen”. The Hill.
  92. ^ Frazin, Rachel (April 4, 2019). “More than 30 Senate Dems ask Trump to reconsider Central American aid cuts”. The Hill.
  93. ^ Turner, Cory (April 5, 2019). “Senators To Consumer Watchdog: Prove You’re Protecting Student Borrowers”. NPR.org.
  94. ^ “Wyden, Merkley urge more affordable housing funds”. ktvz.com. April 16, 2019.
  95. ^ “U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin Helps Introduce Comprehensive Reform to Address Skyrocketing Prescription Drug Prices”. urbanmilwaukee.com. June 12, 2019.
  96. ^ Baldwin, Tammy (August 9, 2019). “U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin to FDA: Hold AveXis Accountable for Falsifying Data”. Urban Milwaukee.
  97. ^ Faulkner, Todd; Priewe, James (January 8, 2021). “Illinois’ Durbin and Bost share thoughts after Capitol riot”. WPSD Local 6. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  98. ^ Kinsaul, Russell (January 8, 2021). [kmov.com/news/senators-blunt-durbin-comment-on-capitol-chaos-impeachment-and-hawley/article_35e40386-5213-11eb-b756-c3fd4b591422.html “Senators Blunt, Durbin comment on Capitol chaos, impeachment and Hawley”] Check |url= value (help). KMOV4. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  99. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on June 24, 2005. Retrieved June 21, 2005.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  100. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on November 3, 2006. Retrieved October 31, 2006.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  101. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on September 28, 2007. Retrieved August 16, 2006.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  102. ^ a b Murray, Shailagh (June 22, 2005). “Durbin Apologizes for Remarks on Abuse”. The Washington Post. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  103. ^ “Durbin’s Gitmo remarks draw fire back in Illinois”. The Washtington Times. June 19, 2005. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  104. ^ “News and Events | Veterans of Foreign Wars”. Vfw.org. Archived from the original on January 14, 2010. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  105. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on June 24, 2005. Retrieved June 24, 2005.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  106. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007. Retrieved November 14, 2006.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  107. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on September 11, 2005. Retrieved June 25, 2005.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  108. ^ “Durbin fucked up”. Dailykos.com. June 22, 2005. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  109. ^ “New Radio Ad Slams Durbin on Equal Pay”. Capitol Fax. July 11, 2014.
  110. ^ “Dick Durbin Pays Female Staffers $11K Less Than Men, on Average”. The Washington Times. April 8, 2014.
  111. ^ “America’s PAC’s Advertisement Regarding Senator Dick Durbin” (PDF). Americaspc527.com. Retrieved August 1, 2016.
  112. ^ “Intimidation from Durbin?”. Quincy Times. July 18, 2014. Archived from the original on August 10, 2014.
  113. ^ “Official Vote” (PDF). Illinois State Board of Elections.
  114. ^ “Victorious regulars may steady Springfield”. Newspapers.com.
  115. ^ “IL State Senate 50”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  116. ^ “OFFICIAL VOTE Cast at the GENERAL PRIMARY ELECTION MARCH 21, 1978” (PDF). www.elections.il.gov. Illinois State Board of Elections.
  117. ^ “1978 Gubernatorial General Election Results – Illinois”. uselectionatlas.org. Dave Leip’s Atlas of U.S. Elections. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  118. ^ a b c d “Downloadable Vote Totals”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved April 13, 2020.
  119. ^ a b c “Election Statistics, 1920 to Present”. History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives. p. 13. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  120. ^ “Election Statistics, 1920 to Present”. History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives. p. 16. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  121. ^ “Election Statistics, 1920 to Present”. History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives. p. 15. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  122. ^ “Election Statistics, 1920 to Present”. History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives. p. 12. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  123. ^ “Election Statistics, 1920 to Present”. History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives. p. 23. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  124. ^ “Election Statistics, 1920 to Present”. History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives. p. 21. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  125. ^ “Election Results 2002 GENERAL ELECTION”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  126. ^ “Election Results 2008 GENERAL ELECTION”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  127. ^ “Election Results 2014 GENERAL ELECTION”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  128. ^ “Election Results 2020 GENERAL ELECTION”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved December 12, 2020.
  129. ^ “Daughter of Illinois Sen. Durbin dies at 40 — chicagotribune.com”. www.chicagotribune.com. Archived from the original on November 6, 2008. Retrieved November 1, 2008.
  130. ^ a b c Skiba, Katherine; Geiger, Kim (October 4, 2014). “When Interests Overlap for Durbin, Lobbyist Wife”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved July 29, 2016.
  131. ^ Spearie, Steven (June 19, 2014). “Paprocki: Durbin still not welcome at communion”. The State Journal-Register. Retrieved July 8, 2018.
  132. ^ Brachear, Manya A. (April 2, 2004). “Durbin keeps faith, despite votes”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  133. ^ a b DeSanctis, Alexandra (September 6, 2017). “Dianne Feinstein Attacks Judicial Nominee’s Catholic Faith”. National Review. Retrieved September 9, 2018.
  134. ^ Groppe, Maureen (October 31, 2017). “Donnelly one of few Democrats to back potential Supreme Court justice Amy Coney Barrett”. Indianapolis Star. Retrieved September 9, 2018.
  135. ^ DeSanctis, Alexandra (September 8, 2017). “Did Durbin and Feinstein Impose a Religious Test for Office?”. National Review. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  136. ^ “EDITORIAL: Religious Tests Unfit for Court”. The Hoya. September 15, 2017. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  137. ^ “Pricele$$ (TV Movie 2010) – Full Cast & Crew”. IMDb. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  138. ^ “The Gettysburg Address – Full Cast & Crew”. IMDb. Retrieved November 7, 2019.

Further reading

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Paul Findley
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois’s 20th congressional district

1983–1997
Succeeded by
John Shimkus
Party political offices
Preceded by
Neil Hartigan
Democratic nominee for Lieutenant Governor of Illinois
1978
Succeeded by
Grace Mary Stern
Preceded by
Paul Simon
Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from Illinois
(Class 2)

1996, 2002, 2008, 2014, 2020
Most recent
Preceded by
Harry Reid
Senate Democratic Whip
2005–present
Incumbent
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
Paul Simon
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Illinois
1997–present
Served alongside: Carol Moseley Braun, Peter Fitzgerald, Barack Obama, Roland Burris, Mark Kirk, Tammy Duckworth
Incumbent
Preceded by
Harry Reid
Senate Minority Whip
2005–2007
Succeeded by
Trent Lott
Preceded by
Mitch McConnell
Senate Majority Whip
2007–2015
Succeeded by
John Cornyn
Preceded by
John Cornyn
Senate Minority Whip
2015–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Chuck Grassley
Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee
2021–present
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Ron Wyden
United States senators by seniority
9th
Succeeded by
Jack Reed


Recent Elections

2014 US Senator

Richard Durbin (D)1,929,63753.5%
Jim Oberweis (R)1,538,52242.7%
TOTAL3,468,159

Source: Ballotpedia

Finances

DURBIN, RICHARD J (DICK) has run in 2 races for public office, winning 2 of them. The candidate has raised a total of $15,813,347.

Source: Follow the Money

Committees

Committees

APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE
   Senator Durbin is the first Illinois Senator in more than a quarter century to serve on the powerful Senate Appropriations Committee, a position that allows him to advocate for federal priorities important to Illinois. In his service with the committee, he has helped secure funding for everything from veterans care and schools to highways and health care clinics. In 2013 and 2014, Senator Durbin served as Chairman of the Appropriations Committee’s Subcommittee on Defense, and today is the Subcommittee’s Ranking Democrat. The Defense Appropriations Subcommittee controls nearly half of the nation’s annual discretionary budget and is important for Illinois, home to Naval Station Great Lakes, the Rock Island Arsenal, and Scott Air Force Base.
RULES AND ADMINISTRATION
   Serving on the Rules Committee since 2007, Senator Durbin has worked to increase access to voting and improve the election process, including through efforts to strengthen our election security in the aftermath of the Russian government’s attacks on our election system in 2016. Senator Durbin has also supported efforts to improve and strengthen Congressional transparency and ethics standards, as well as the policies and procedures available to victims of harassment and discrimination in Congress.
JUDICIARY
   Senator Durbin first served on the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1997. Senator Durbin became the founding Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Human Rights and the Law, the first standing body of the Senate focused on human rights, in 2007. In January 2011, the Subcommittee’s jurisdiction expanded to include constitutional and civil rights issues and was renamed the Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Human Rights. As Chairman, Senator Durbin convened hearings and worked with colleagues to modernize human rights law, examine human rights abuses in our criminal justice system, and the role of American technology companies in promoting global internet freedom. In 2015, Senator Durbin served as the Ranking Democrat on the Subcommittee. In 2017, Senator Durbin became the top Democrat on the Senate Subcommittee on Immigration, and remains in that position today.
AGRICULTURE, NUTRITION, AND FORESTRY
   Senator Durbin joined the Committee on Agriculture, Rules, and Forestry this year for the 116th Congress. The Committee’s work centers on helping to establish, guide, and examine agricultural policies in the United States. This includes maintaining a strong safety-net for family farms, trade, food safety, nutrition, and conservation. Illinois is one of the top agriculture states in the nation, and Senator Durbin pushes for Illinois agricultural priorities that strengthen the economy and rural communities across the state.

Voting Record

See: Vote Smart

Issues

Committees

ldljd

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

JUDICIARY

Senator Durbin is currently the Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, where he has served as a member for more than 20 years. As Chair, Durbin leads this historic Committee as they consider immigration and criminal justice reform, work to combat hate crimes and domestic terrorism, oversee the nominations process for our nation’s federal courts up to and including the Supreme Court, and more.

During his tenure on the Committee, Durbin has led efforts to restore and strengthen the Voting Rights Act, increase transparency in federal courts, conduct Department of Justice oversight, reduce gun violence, reform bankruptcy laws to help students and workers, and protect intellectual property. Read more about Durbin’s work as Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee here.

APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE

Senator Durbin is the first Illinois Senator in more than a quarter century to serve on the powerful Senate Appropriations Committee, a position that allows him to advocate for federal priorities important to Illinois. In his service with the committee, he has helped secure funding for everything from veterans care and schools to highways and health care clinics.  In 2013 and 2014, Senator Durbin served as Chairman of the Appropriations Committee’s Subcommittee on Defense, and today is the Subcommittee’s Ranking Democrat.  The Defense Appropriations Subcommittee controls nearly half of the nation’s annual discretionary budget and is important for Illinois, home to Naval Station Great Lakes, the Rock Island Arsenal, and Scott Air Force Base.

AGRICULTURE, NUTRITION, AND FORESTRY

Senator Durbin joined the Committee on Agriculture, Rules, and Forestry this year for the 116th Congress. The Committee’s work centers on helping to establish, guide, and examine agricultural policies in the United States. This includes maintaining a strong safety-net for family farms, trade, food safety, nutrition, and conservation. Illinois is one of the top agriculture states in the nation, and Senator Durbin pushes for Illinois agricultural priorities that strengthen the economy and rural communities across the state.

 

Civil Rights

JUSTICE AND CIVIL RIGHTS

As a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, I have been actively working to make our communities safer and promote justice both in Illinois and across the nation. Addressing these issues takes a comprehensive approach. We need to provide better options for young people who are at risk of becoming involved in gangs or other criminal activities. We need to ensure that our criminal justice laws are not just firm, but fair. And we need to protect the civil and human rights of all Americans.

Economy

JOBS AND THE ECONOMY

To promote long-term economic growth and create jobs for the 21st century, America must invest now in our physical, human, and intellectual capital. We must out-build, out-educate, and out-innovate our international competitors so that our companies can produce the best products and hire the best people. This is why Senator Durbin supports investments in national labs and world-class universities in Illinois, Illinois’ infrastructure, youth workforce development, and retraining Illinois’ workers for jobs of the future.

Education

EDUCATION

Education is the key to future individual success and a strong economy. We must work to expand educational opportunities for all students in Illinois and throughout the nation. The future of our country depends on the education we provide to our children today.

Access to a quality education—from pre-Kindergarten through higher education—should not be a luxury only for the wealthy. The cost of higher education has increased dramatically in recent decades, and student debt has tripled over the last decade. This debt often destroys personal financial security and threatens national economic growth as young people put off buying cars and homes, starting families and businesses, and saving for retirement.

I am working to ensure that all students, regardless of their economic status, receive a quality college education that will help them get ahead without saddling them with a mountain of debt. I have fought for legislation to maintain affordable federal student loan rates; increase access to free and open textbooks; investigate the deceptive practices of many for-profit colleges; and encourage our best and brightest students to choose a profession in public service. I will continue to focus on making a quality education accessible and affordable to all.

Environment

ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Illinois has an abundance of resources including coal, agriculture, prairie, lakes, and rivers. These resources keep our economy moving. They give water to sustain us, provide recreation, and tell the story of our history. While abundant, these resources are not unlimited. Fortunately, Illinois is also home to cutting-edge technology to efficiently use and preserve these resources. From clean coal technology to biofuels to our national laboratories at Argonne and Fermi, our world-class research is paving a path for sustainability for the entire nation. Clean, renewable energy supports jobs for Illinoisans in a growing industry.

We depend on clean water and a vibrant ecosystem for our health, recreation, and economy. The Great Lakes are the largest fresh water supply in the nation, containing about 20 percent of all the fresh water in the world. The Lakes serve as the source of drinking water for nearly 40 million people throughout the region and support a wide range of recreational and commercial pursuits. I am committed to preserving wilderness areas in Illinois and across the country for future generations to enjoy.

CLIMATE CHANGE

Health Care

HEALTH CARE

The security of health care should not be a privilege for a fortunate few, but a right for every American. The health and wellness of the American people reflects the health of our nation, both physically and financially.

The cost of healthcare has gone up more quickly than inflation, making it difficult for families and businesses to keep up. The Affordable Care Act is curbing the growth of health care costs, giving patients more control over their care, and providing coverage to millions of Americans who otherwise would not have access to health care. I am committed to continue improving the health of our country now.

If we are serious about improving the economy, we must control health care costs and promote a healthy, productive populace. The best way to do that is to reverse the staggering growth of chronic diseases and invest in public health prevention that keep people healthy in the first place. In the 20th century, we made tremendous strides improving infant and maternal mortality rates, reducing smoking, ensuring the safety and health of our food supply chain, and immunizing more infants. I have helped lead many of these improvements and will continue to support public health and health care, which not only save millions of lives but secures our nation’s health and stability.

Immigration

IMMIGRATION

As the proud son of an immigrant, Senator Durbin believes that immigration makes America great.  Senator Durbin serves as the Ranking Member of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration.

Infrastructure

TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE

A strong national economy depends on a dependable transportation infrastructure, and Illinois operates as the nation’s transportation hub. Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport consistently ranks as one of the world’s busiest airports. Illinois’ rivers and Lake Michigan are the backbone of our inland waterway network. All of the nation’s freight rail lines converge in Illinois. The state’s highway system serves as the crossroads of America. And Illinois is home to the second largest mass transit system in the country.  To maintain the state’s status as the nation’s transportation epicenter, Senator Durbin is working to bring vital federal funding home to Illinois and to make sure federal transportation policy provides Illinois with the support it needs to maintain, expand, and modernize Illinois’ transportation network.

Veterans

MILITARY AND VETERANS

As a leader of the Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, I work every day to ensure that our men and women in uniform are the best trained, best equipped force in the world and that their families receive the support and recognition they deserve. The needs of all our servicemembers – active duty and reserve, in theatre, or here at home – are our first concern.

Thousands of Illinois’s finest serve in the military today. Illinois’ 13,000 National Guard men and women and the tens of thousands of active duty, reservists, and civilian personnel serving at Naval Station Great Lakes, Rock Island Arsenal and Scott Air Force Base defend our nation every day from domestic emergencies and foreign threats. I have worked to secure critical support and resources over multiple years for military missions in or near Illinois, supporting thousands of jobs.

In addition to advocating for our troops, I support those who have served in uniform. Veterans – 750,000 of whom live in Illinois – deserve our deepest gratitude and unqualified support. We, as a nation, have promised veterans that in exchange for their service they will have access to certain benefits and care. These men and women answered the nation’s call to serve, but doing so put strain on them, their families, and their finances. It is our duty in Congress to ease this burden as much as possible and deliver on our promise.

Rural and Agriculture

As one of the top agriculture states in the nation, Illinois and its farmers have an important role to play in many elements of American life from the economy to the environment. Corn is Illinois’ leading crop, followed closely by soybeans. Livestock, dairy and poultry also contribute to farming’s $9 billion in economic impact each year. Illinois also enjoys a strong market in farm machinery manufacturing and biofuels production. To help maintain the agricultural strength of our state and our nation, I have supported tax fairness for farmers, improvements in crop insurance, expanded use of clean-burning and environmentally safe biofuels, increased support for local food production, and increased trade opportunities for agricultural commodities. I have advanced initiatives to strengthen this crucial sector of our economy because boosting the vitality of our nation’s rural regions boosts the vitality of our nation as a whole.

Foreign Policy

Our nation’s foreign policies should advance security and prosperity while promoting American values of freedom, democracy, tolerance, compassion, trade, and the rule of law. The United States has many important diplomatic and security interests around the world and Senator Durbin believes the United States must remain a leader and active participant on the international stage with our allies, NATO partners, and others.

The United States has strong economic interests and relationships around the world, with many Illinois jobs directly linked to exports.  Senator Durbin has led efforts to encourage economic growth and opportunities for American exports in emerging markets around the world.

Additionally, U.S. foreign policy extends beyond diplomatic and military initiatives to include humanitarian and development assistance aimed at saving lives and building more stable nations.  Senator Durbin has championed U.S. assistance that helps provide clean water and access to sanitation to the world’s most poor as well as to reduce rates of HIV/AIDS and malaria—both as an expression of American values and to strengthen America’s standing abroad. Senator Durbin has also been an active advocate for humanitarian assistance in areas of conflict and for refugees fleeing violence or repression. He has supported programs and funding to help children in need and to increase access to education, as well as to protect young girls forced to marry at a young age or young boys forced to become child soldiers.  Senator Durbin has also been a champion of global human rights standards, and as such, regularly advocates for the release of political prisoners around the world.

At times, international crises demand additional U.S. attention, including the potential use of our military. In those situations in which U.S. military action may be warranted, Senator Durbin has exercised the utmost deliberation for this most critical decision that requires Congressional authorization.

X
Tammy DuckworthTammy Duckworth- Il

Current Position: US Senator since 2017
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): US Senator; Assistant Secretary of Veterans Affairs from 2009 – 2011

Featured Quote: 
As many of us have come to know, the road to parenthood isn’t always easy. Today, @RepPressley
and I are introducing the Support Through Loss Act to support families across the nation who are suffering through the unimaginable.

Featured Video: 
Tammy Duckworth on a “more perfect union”

Other Positions: U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee Subcommittee:
Airland, Chair
U.S. Senate Committee on Environment & Public Works Subcommittee:
Fisheries, Water and Wildlife, Chair

 

Combat Veteran and U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth, a member of the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee who served in the Reserve Forces for 23 years, today met with leaders of several Quad Cities organizations and advocates focused on efforts to resettle Afghan partners and allies who sacrificed for the United States’ mission in Afghanistan. Duckworth met with World Relief Quad Cities Director Laura Fontaine and Program Manager Jen Osing, Doris & Victor Day Foundation Executive Director and Rock Island Alderman David Greenen and Omidullah Barikzay, an Afghan immigrant and current Rock Island resident, to discuss the importance of our communities welcoming these brave Afghans to their new home. A photo from today’s meeting is available here.

“Our Afghan allies and partners did their part for us, time and again, for two decades half a world away,” Duckworth said. “When they begin to resettle here in Illinois, in the Quad Cities, we must do our part for them, too. It is our dutyas neighbors, friends, Americansto welcome these brave Afghans and help settle them into their new homes.”

Duckworth on 20th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks
Sen. Tammy DuckworthSeptember 11, 2021
i

[HOFFMAN ESTATES, IL] – Combat Veteran and U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth (D-IL), a member of the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee who served in the Reserve Forces for 23 years, issued the following statement today after the last U.S. troops departed Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan:

“My heartfelt appreciation and thoughts are with the families of the American servicemembers killed in the line of duty during last week’s terrorist attack in Kabul, with those recovering from their wounds as well as with the more than 800,000 servicemembers and all the military families who have served and sacrificed in Afghanistan over the last 20 years. My heart also goes out to the many wounded and killed Afghan civilians, especially those who’ve put themselves and their families at risk in order to support our nation’s mission. As President Biden said, we will continue hunting those responsible for this heinous attack and holding them accountable.

“Since Afghanistan fell to the Taliban, American troops bravely and tirelessly worked to execute their dangerous mission with precision and expertise in order to safely evacuate as many Americans who wanted to leave the country as possible. Despite their herculean efforts to airlift more than 123,000 people out of Afghanistan in a matter of days, there are still Americans who wish to come home, so our efforts to get them out cannot stop now. Our nation must redouble our efforts to negotiate and work with partners in the region to bring about safe passage for all Americans who want to return—including American hostage and Illinoisan Mark Frerichs.

Summary

Current Position: US Senator since 2017
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): US Senator; Assistant Secretary of Veterans Affairs from 2009 – 2011

Featured Quote: 
As many of us have come to know, the road to parenthood isn’t always easy. Today, @RepPressley
and I are introducing the Support Through Loss Act to support families across the nation who are suffering through the unimaginable.

Featured Video: 
Tammy Duckworth on a “more perfect union”

Other Positions: U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee Subcommittee:
Airland, Chair
U.S. Senate Committee on Environment & Public Works Subcommittee:
Fisheries, Water and Wildlife, Chair

 

News

Combat Veteran and U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth, a member of the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee who served in the Reserve Forces for 23 years, today met with leaders of several Quad Cities organizations and advocates focused on efforts to resettle Afghan partners and allies who sacrificed for the United States’ mission in Afghanistan. Duckworth met with World Relief Quad Cities Director Laura Fontaine and Program Manager Jen Osing, Doris & Victor Day Foundation Executive Director and Rock Island Alderman David Greenen and Omidullah Barikzay, an Afghan immigrant and current Rock Island resident, to discuss the importance of our communities welcoming these brave Afghans to their new home. A photo from today’s meeting is available here.

“Our Afghan allies and partners did their part for us, time and again, for two decades half a world away,” Duckworth said. “When they begin to resettle here in Illinois, in the Quad Cities, we must do our part for them, too. It is our dutyas neighbors, friends, Americansto welcome these brave Afghans and help settle them into their new homes.”

Duckworth on 20th Anniversary of 9/11 Attacks
Sen. Tammy DuckworthSeptember 11, 2021
i

[HOFFMAN ESTATES, IL] – Combat Veteran and U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth (D-IL), a member of the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee who served in the Reserve Forces for 23 years, issued the following statement today after the last U.S. troops departed Hamid Karzai International Airport in Kabul, Afghanistan:

“My heartfelt appreciation and thoughts are with the families of the American servicemembers killed in the line of duty during last week’s terrorist attack in Kabul, with those recovering from their wounds as well as with the more than 800,000 servicemembers and all the military families who have served and sacrificed in Afghanistan over the last 20 years. My heart also goes out to the many wounded and killed Afghan civilians, especially those who’ve put themselves and their families at risk in order to support our nation’s mission. As President Biden said, we will continue hunting those responsible for this heinous attack and holding them accountable.

“Since Afghanistan fell to the Taliban, American troops bravely and tirelessly worked to execute their dangerous mission with precision and expertise in order to safely evacuate as many Americans who wanted to leave the country as possible. Despite their herculean efforts to airlift more than 123,000 people out of Afghanistan in a matter of days, there are still Americans who wish to come home, so our efforts to get them out cannot stop now. Our nation must redouble our efforts to negotiate and work with partners in the region to bring about safe passage for all Americans who want to return—including American hostage and Illinoisan Mark Frerichs.

Twitter

About

Tammy Duckworth 2

Source: Government page

Senator Tammy Duckworth served in the Reserve Forces for 23 years before retiring at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in 2014. She was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2016 after representing Illinois’s Eighth Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives for two terms.

In 2004, Duckworth was deployed to Iraq as a Blackhawk helicopter pilot for the Illinois Army National Guard. On November 12, 2004, her helicopter was hit by an RPG and she lost her legs and partial use of her right arm. Senator Duckworth spent the next year recovering at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, where she quickly became an advocate for her fellow Soldiers. After she recovered, she became Director of the Illinois Department of Veterans’ Affairs, where she helped create a tax credit for employers that hire Veterans, established a first-in-the-nation 24/7 Veterans crisis hotline and developed innovative programs to improve Veterans’ access to housing and health care.

In 2009, President Obama appointed Duckworth as an Assistant Secretary of Veterans Affairs, where she coordinated a joint initiative with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to help end Veteran homelessness, worked to address the unique challenges faced by female as well as Native American Veterans and created the Office of Online Communications to improve the VA’s accessibility, especially among young Veterans.

In the U.S. House, Duckworth served on the Armed Services Committee and was an advocate for working families and job creation, introducing bills like her bipartisan Friendly Airports for Mothers (FAM) Act to ensure new mothers have access to safe, clean and accessible lactation rooms when traveling through airports, which is now law. She helped lead passage of the bipartisan Clay Hunt SAV Act, which enhanced efforts to track and reduce Veteran suicides. She also passed the Troop Talent Act to help returning Veterans find jobs in the private sector and worked to cut waste and fraud at the Pentagon and throughout government, including passing a common-sense provision that was projected to save taxpayers $4 billion by reducing redundancy in military uniforms.

In the U.S. Senate, Duckworth advocates for practical, common-sense solutions needed to move our state and country forward like rebuilding our crumbling infrastructure, protecting Illinoisans from lead poisoning, growing manufacturing jobs while supporting minority-owned small businesses, investing in communities that have been ignored for too long and making college more affordable for all Americans. She co-founded the Senate’s first-ever Environmental Justice Caucus and also continues her lifelong mission of supporting, protecting and keeping the promises we’ve made to our Veterans as well as ensuring that we stand fully behind the troops our nation sends into danger overseas. In 2018, after Duckworth became the first Senator to give birth while serving in office, she sent a message to working families across the country about the value of family-friendly policies by securing a historic rules change that allows Senators to bring their infant children onto the Senate floor.

As Senator, she advocates for practical, common-sense solutions needed to move our country and our state forward
Senator Duckworth serves on several influential committees that give her an important platform to advocate for Illinois’s working families and entrepreneurs: the Armed Services Committee; the Environment & Public Works Committee; the Commerce, Science, & Transportation Committee; and the Small Business & Entrepreneurship Committee. The first Senate bill she introduced—which supports Illinois jobs by helping prevent bureaucratic delays in infrastructure projects—became law in record time. As a result of her achievements, Duckworth has been recognized by the Center for Effective lawmaking as among the top five most effective Democratic Senators overall and the most effective on transportation issues in the 116th Congress. She was also recognized as the most effective freshman Democratic Senator in the 115th Congress.

Duckworth is fluent in Thai and Indonesian. She attended college at the University of Hawaii and earned a Master of Arts in International Affairs from the George Washington University. Following graduation, Duckworth moved to Illinois and began pursuing a Ph.D. in Political Science at Northern Illinois University and later worked for Rotary International. To this day, the Senator volunteers at local food pantries and participates in community service projects in her free time.

Senator Duckworth and her husband Bryan are the proud parents of two daughters, Abigail and Maile.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

  • Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus
  • Expand Social Security Caucus

Offices

CHICAGO
230 South Dearborn Street
Suite 3900
Chicago, IL 60604
Phone (312) 886-3506
DIRECTIONS
SPRINGFIELD
8 South Old State Capitol Plaza
Springfield, IL 62701
Phone (217) 528-6124
DIRECTIONS
CARBONDALE
441 East Willow Street
Carbondale, IL 62901
Phone (618) 677-7000
Fax (618) 351-1551
DIRECTIONS
ROCK ISLAND
1823 2nd Ave., Suite 2
Rock Island, IL 61201
Phone (309) 606-7060
Fax (309) 786-1799
DIRECTIONS
BELLEVILLE
23 Public Square, Suite 460
Belleville, IL 62220
Phone (618) 722-7070
Fax (618) 235-4011
DIRECTIONS
WASHINGTON, D.C.
524 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510
Phone: (202) 224-2854

 

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Twitter, Campaign Site, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Ladda Tammy Duckworth[2] (born March 12, 1968) is an American politician and retired Army National Guard lieutenant colonel serving as the junior United States Senator from Illinois since 2017. A member of the Democratic Party, she represented Illinois’s 8th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 2013 to 2017.

Duckworth was educated at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and George Washington University. A combat veteran of the Iraq War, she served as a U.S. Army helicopter pilot. In 2004, when her helicopter was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade fired by Iraqi insurgents, she suffered severe combat wounds, losing both legs and some mobility in her right arm. She was the first female double amputee from the war.[3] Despite her grievous injuries, she sought and obtained a medical waiver that allowed her to continue serving in the Illinois Army National Guard until she retired as a lieutenant colonel in 2014.

Duckworth ran unsuccessfully for a seat in the United States House of Representatives in 2006, then served as director of the Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs from 2006 to 2009 and as assistant secretary for public and intergovernmental affairs at the United States Department of Veterans Affairs from 2009 to 2011. In 2012, Duckworth was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, where she served two terms. Duckworth was elected to the U.S. Senate in 2016, defeating Republican incumbent Mark Kirk.[4] She is the first Thai American woman elected to Congress, the first person born in Thailand elected to Congress, the first woman with a disability elected to Congress, the first female double amputee in the Senate, and the first senator to give birth while in office. Duckworth is the second of three Asian American women to serve in the U.S. Senate, after Mazie Hirono, and before Kamala Harris.

Early life and education

Duckworth was born in Bangkok, Thailand, the daughter of Franklin Duckworth and Lamai Sompornpairin.[5] Under long-standing US law, she is a natural-born citizen because her father was American.[6][7] Her father, who died in 2005,[8] was a veteran of the U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps[9] who traced his family’s American roots to the American Revolutionary War.[10] Her mother is Thai Chinese[11] and originally from Chiang Mai.[12] Her father worked with the United Nations and international companies in refugee, housing, and development programs,[13] and the family moved around Southeast Asia. Duckworth became fluent in Thai and Indonesian, in addition to English.[14]

Duckworth attended Singapore American School, the International School Bangkok, and the Jakarta International School.[15][16] The family moved to Honolulu, Hawaii, when Duckworth was 16, and she attended Honolulu’s McKinley High School, where she participated in track and field and graduated in 1985.[17] Because of a difference in the grade levels between the school systems she attended, Duckworth skipped half of her ninth grade year and half of her tenth.[18] She was a Girl Scout, and earned her First Class, now called the Gold Award.[19] Her father was unemployed for a time, and the family relied on public assistance.[13] She graduated from the University of Hawaii at Manoa in 1989 with a Bachelor of Arts in political science. In 1992, she received a Master of Arts in international affairs from George Washington University‘s Elliott School of International Affairs.[20][21] She began a PhD program at Northern Illinois University, which was interrupted by her war service.[22] She completed a PhD in human services at Capella University in March 2015.[23]

Military service

Captain Duckworth in 2000

Following in the footsteps of her father, who served in World War II and the Vietnam War,[9] and ancestors who served in every major conflict since the Revolutionary War,[10] Duckworth joined the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps[24] in 1990 as a graduate student at George Washington University.[25][26] She became a commissioned officer in the United States Army Reserve in 1992 and chose to fly helicopters[24] because it was one of the few combat jobs open to women at that time.[27] As a member of the Army Reserve, she went to flight school, later transferring to the Army National Guard and in 1996 entering the Illinois Army National Guard.[24] Duckworth also worked as a staff supervisor at Rotary International headquarters in Evanston, Illinois,[28][29] and was the coordinator of the Center for Nursing Research at Northern Illinois University.[30]

Duckworth was working toward a Ph.D. in political science at Northern Illinois University, with research interests in the political economy and public health of southeast Asia, when she was deployed to Iraq in 2004.[28] She lost her right leg near the hip and her left leg below the knee[31] from injuries sustained on November 12, 2004, when the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter she was co-piloting was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade fired by Iraqi insurgents.[32] She was the first American female double amputee from the Iraq War.[3] The explosion severely broke her right arm and tore tissue from it, necessitating major surgery to repair it. Duckworth received a Purple Heart[32] on December 3 and was promoted to Major on December 21 at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center,[33] where she was presented with an Air Medal and Army Commendation Medal.[32] She retired from the Illinois Army National Guard in October 2014 as a lieutenant colonel.[34]

Duckworth with Senators Barack Obama and Daniel Akaka in 2005 at a Veterans Affairs hearing

In 2011 the Daughters of the American Revolution erected a statue with Duckworth’s likeness and that of Molly Pitcher in Mount Vernon, Illinois. The statue was dedicated to female veterans.[35]

Government service

Duckworth being sworn in as Assistant Secretary of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs for the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, by Judge John J. Farley with her husband Bryan Bowlsbey beside her

On November 21, 2006, several weeks after losing her first congressional campaign, Duckworth was appointed director of the Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs by Governor Rod Blagojevich.[36][37] She served in that position until February 8, 2009. While director, she was credited with starting a program to help veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and veterans with brain injuries.[38]

Duckworth speaks during the third night of the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado

On September 17, 2008, Duckworth attended a campaign event for Dan Seals, the Democratic candidate for Illinois’s 10th congressional district. She used vacation time, but violated Illinois law by going to the event in a state-owned van that was equipped for a person with physical disabilities. She acknowledged the mistake and repaid the state for the use of the van.[39]

In 2009, two Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs employees at the Anna Veterans’ Home in Union County filed a lawsuit against Duckworth.[40] The lawsuit alleged that she wrongfully terminated one employee and threatened and intimidated another for bringing reports of abuse and misconduct of veterans when she was head of the Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs.[41] Duckworth was represented in the suit by the Illinois Attorney General’s office.[42] The case was dismissed twice but refilings were allowed.[43][44] The case settled in June 2016 for $26,000 with no admission of wrongdoing.[43] The plaintiffs later indicated they no longer wanted to settle, but the judge gave them 21 days to sign the settlement and canceled the trial.[45][46]

On February 3, 2009, President Barack Obama nominated Duckworth to be the Assistant Secretary of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs for the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).[47] and the United States Senate confirmed her for the position on April 22.[48] As Assistant Secretary, she coordinated a joint initiative with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to help end Veteran homelessness, worked to address the unique challenges faced by female as well as Native American Veterans and created the Office of Online Communications to improve the VA’s accessibility, especially among young Veterans.[49] Duckworth resigned her position in June 2011 in order to launch her campaign for the U.S. House of Representatives in Illinois’s 8th congressional district.[50]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2006

After longtime incumbent Republican Henry Hyde announced his retirement from Congress, several candidates began campaigning for the open seat. Duckworth won the Democratic primary with a plurality of 44%, defeating 2004 nominee Christine Cegelis with 40%, and Wheaton College professor Lindy Scott with 16%. State Senator Peter Roskam was unopposed in the Republican primary. For the general election, Duckworth was endorsed by EMILY’s List, a political action committee that supports female Democratic candidates who back abortion rights.[51] Duckworth was also endorsed by the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence and the Fraternal Order of Police.[52][53] While she raised $4.5 million to Roskam’s $3.44 million, Duckworth lost by 4,810 votes, receiving 49% to Roskam’s 51%.[54]

2012

Duckworth as a U.S. Representative during the 113th congress

In July 2011, Duckworth launched her campaign to run in 2012 for Illinois’s 8th congressional district. She defeated former Deputy Treasurer of Illinois Raja Krishnamoorthi for the Democratic nomination on March 20, 2012, then faced incumbent Republican Joe Walsh in the general election.[55] Duckworth received the endorsement of both the Chicago Tribune and the Daily Herald.[56][57] Walsh generated controversy when in July 2012, at a campaign event, he accused Duckworth of politicizing her military service and injuries, saying “my God, that’s all she talks about. Our true heroes, the men and women who served us, it’s the last thing in the world they talk about.” Walsh called the controversy over his comments “a political ploy to distort my words and distract voters” and said that “Of course Tammy Duckworth is a hero … I have called her a hero hundreds of times.”[58]

On November 6, 2012, Duckworth defeated Walsh 55%–45%,[59] making her the first Asian-American from Illinois in Congress,[60] the first woman with a disability elected to Congress,[61] and the first member of Congress born in Thailand.[62]

2014

In the 2014 general election, Duckworth faced Republican Larry Kaifesh, a United States Marine Corps officer who had recently left active duty as a colonel.[63] Duckworth defeated Kaifesh with 56% of the vote.[64]

Tenure

Duckworth was sworn into office on January 3, 2013.[65]

On April 3, 2013, Duckworth publicly returned 8.4% ($1,218) of her congressional salary for that month to the United States Department of Treasury in solidarity with furloughed government workers.[66]

On June 26, 2013, during a hearing of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Duckworth received national media attention after questioning Strong Castle CEO Braulio Castillo on a $500 million government contract the company had been awarded based on Castillo’s disabled veteran status.[67][68] Castillo had injured his ankle at the US Military Academy’s prep school, USMAPS, in 1984.[69]

Committee assignments

U.S. Senate

Elections

2016

On March 30, 2015, Duckworth announced that she would challenge incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Mark Kirk for his seat in the 2016 Senate election in Illinois.[70] Duckworth defeated fellow Democrats Andrea Zopp and Napoleon Harris in the primary election on March 15, 2016.[71]

During a televised debate on October 27, 2016, Duckworth talked about her ancestors’ past service in the United States military. Kirk responded, “I’d forgotten that your parents came all the way from Thailand to serve George Washington.” The comment led to the Human Rights Campaign withdrawing their endorsement of Kirk and switching it to Duckworth, stating his comments were “deeply offensive and racist.”[72][73]

Duckworth was endorsed by Barack Obama, who actively campaigned for her.[74]

On November 8, Duckworth defeated Kirk 54 percent to 40 percent to win the Senate seat.[75] Duckworth and Kamala Harris, who was also elected in 2016, are the second and third female Asian American senators, after Mazie Hirono who was elected in 2012.[4]

Tenure

Senate Diversity Initiative in support of diversity in the Senate and its staff, June 21, 2017

2010s

According to The Center for Effective Lawmaking (CEL), a joint partnership between the University of Virginia’s Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy and Vanderbilt University,[76] Duckworth’s “Legislative Effectiveness Score” (LES) is “Exceeds Expectations” as a freshman senator in the 115th Congress (2017–2018), the 11th highest out of 48 Democratic senators.[77]

GovTrack’s Report Card on Duckworth for the 115th Congress found that among Senate freshmen, she ranked first in favorably reporting bills out of committee and “Got influential cosponsors the most often compared to Senate freshmen.”[78] GovTrack also found that in the first session of the 116th Congress, Duckworth ranked first in favorably reporting bills out of committee and “Got influential cosponsors the most often compared to Senate sophomores.”[79]

During the 115th Congress, Duckworth was credited with saving the Americans with Disabilities Act.[80] Specifically, she led public opposition to a controversial bill, H.R. 620,[81] and led 42 senators in pledging to oppose any effort to pass H.R. 620 through the Senate.[82] The Veterans Service Organization and Paralyzed Veterans of America recognized Duckworth’s leadership in defending the Americans with Disabilities Act.[83]

In January 2018, when the federal government shut down after the Senate could not agree on a funding bill, Duckworth responded to President Trump’s accusations that the Democrats were putting “unlawful immigrants” ahead of the military:

I spent my entire adult life looking out for the well-being, the training, the equipping of the troops for whom I was responsible. Sadly, this is something that the current occupant of the Oval Office does not seem to care to do—and I will not be lectured about what our military needs by a five-deferment draft dodger. And I have a message for Cadet Bone Spurs: If you cared about our military, you’d stop baiting Kim Jong Un into a war that could put 85,000 American troops, and millions of innocent civilians, in danger.[84]

Stop Kavanaugh press conference on September 6, 2018

In 2018, Duckworth became the first U.S. senator to give birth while in office.[85] Shortly afterward, the Senate passed Senate Resolution 463, which Duckworth introduced on April 12, 2018,[86] by unanimous consent. The resolution changed Senate rules so that a senator may bring a child under one year old to the Senate floor during votes.[87] The day after the rules were changed, Duckworth’s daughter became the first baby on the Senate floor.[86][88]

2020s

On April 15, 2020, the Trump administration invited Duckworth to join a bipartisan task force on the reopening of the economy amid the COVID-19 pandemic.[89]

Duckworth was publicly critical of Trump’s decision to nominate Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court in September 2020. Barrett, a devout Catholic, is a member of a group that considers in vitro fertilization morally illicit. Duckworth said that Barrett’s membership in such an organization was “disqualifying and, frankly, insulting to every parent”. Both of Duckworth’s children were conceived by IVF.[90]

The Center for Effective Lawmaking, a joint initiative of the University of Virginia and Vanderbilt University, ranked Duckworth the fifth most effective Democratic senator in the 116th Congress and the most effective Democratic senator on transportation policy.[91] Professors Craig Volden and Alan Wiseman, co-directors of the Center for Effective Lawmaking, stated, “While still in her first term, Senator Tammy Duckworth has risen to the top five among effective Democratic lawmakers in the Senate. She sponsored 77 bills in the 116th Congress, with four of them passing the Republican-controlled Senate and two becoming law.”[92]

Duckworth was participating in the certification of the 2021 United States Electoral College vote count when Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol. In the wake of the attack, Duckworth called Trump “a threat to our nation” and called for his immediate removal from office through the invocation of the Twenty-fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution or impeachment.[93] Two days later, on January 8, she also called for the resignation of Representative Mary Miller, who had quoted Adolf Hitler during a speech on January 5.[94]

Committee assignments

Current

Previous

Caucus memberships

National politics

Duckworth has spoken at the 2008, 2012, 2016, and 2020 Democratic National Conventions.[96][97][98] She was the permanent co-chair of the 2020 Democratic National Convention.[99] At the 2020 convention she called Trump “coward-in-chief” for not supporting the American military.[100][101]

Duckworth was vetted as a possible running mate during Joe Biden‘s vice presidential candidate selection.[102] Fellow U.S. Senator Kamala Harris was instead selected. Biden nominated Duckworth to serve as Vice Chair of the Democratic National Committee, along with Gretchen Whitmer, Keisha Lance Bottoms and Filemon Vela Jr.[103]

Political positions

Environment

In April 2019, Duckworth was one of 12 senators to sign a bipartisan letter to top senators on the Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development advocating that the Energy Department be granted maximum funding for carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS), arguing that American job growth could be stimulated by investment in viable options to capture carbon emissions and expressing disagreement with Trump’s 2020 budget request to combine the two federal programs that include carbon capture research.[104]

Foreign policy

Duckworth narrates the Salute to Fallen Asian Pacific Islander Heroes in Arlington, Virginia, June 2, 2005.

During her unsuccessful congressional campaign in 2006, Duckworth called on Congress to audit the estimated $437 billion spent on overseas military and foreign aid since September 11, 2001.[105]

On September 30, 2006, Duckworth gave the Democratic Party’s response to President George W. Bush‘s weekly radio address. In it, she was critical of Bush’s strategy for the Iraq War.[106]

In October 2006, The Sunday Times reported that Duckworth agreed with General Sir Richard Dannatt, the British Army chief, that the presence of coalition troops was exacerbating the conflict in Iraq.[107]

Duckworth supports continued U.S. military aid to Israel and opposes the movement for Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) against Israel. She voiced her opposition to Israel’s plan to annex parts of the occupied West Bank.[108]

In May 2019, Duckworth was a cosponsor of the South China Sea and East China Sea Sanctions Act,[109] a bipartisan bill reintroduced by Marco Rubio and Ben Cardin that was intended to disrupt China‘s consolidation or expansion of its claims of jurisdiction over both the sea and air space in disputed zones in the South China Sea.[110]

On June 6, 2021, Duckworth and Senators Dan Sullivan and Christopher Coons visited Taipei in an U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster III transport to meet President Tsai Ing-wen and Minister Joseph Wu during the pandemic outbreak of Taiwan to announce President Joe Biden‘s donation plan of 750,000 COVID-19 vaccines included in the global COVAX program.[111][112]

Gun law

Duckworth was rated by the National Rifle Association as having a pro-gun control congressional voting record.[113] Duckworth, who is a gun owner herself, cites violence in Chicago as a major influence for her support of gun control. She supports universal background checks and the halting of state-to-state gun trafficking.[114]

Duckworth participated in the 2016 Chris Murphy gun control filibuster. During the sit-in, Duckworth hid her mobile phone in her prosthetic leg to avoid it being taken away from her since taking pictures and recording on the House floor is against policy.[114]

In a 2016 interview with GQ magazine, Duckworth stated that gaining control of the Senate and “closing the gap” in the House would be necessary in order to pass common sense gun laws. She also stated that she believed moderate Republicans, who support common sense gun control, would have more power to influence gun control if they were not “pushed aside by those folks who are absolutely beholden to the NRA. And so we never get the vote.”[114]

Health policy

Duckworth supports abortion rights[115][116] and the Affordable Care Act.[117]

Immigration

Duckworth supports comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to citizenship for those in the country illegally. She would admit 100,000 Syrian refugees into the United States.[117]

In August 2018, Duckworth was one of seventeen senators to sign a letter spearheaded by Kamala Harris to United States Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen demanding that the Trump administration take immediate action in attempting to reunite 539 migrant children with their families, citing each passing day of inaction as intensifying “trauma that this administration has needlessly caused for children and their families seeking humanitarian protection.”[118]

Electoral history

Illinois 6th Congressional District Democratic Primary, 2006[119]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic L. Tammy Duckworth 14,283 43.85
DemocraticChristine Cegelis13,15940.40
DemocraticLindy Scott5,13315.76
Total votes32,575 100.0
Illinois 6th Congressional District General Election, 2006[120]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Peter J. Roskam 91,382 51.35
DemocraticL. Tammy Duckworth86,57248.65
Write-in votesPatricia Elaine Beard30.00
Total votes177,957 100.0
Illinois 8th Congressional District Democratic Primary, 2012[121]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Tammy Duckworth 17,097 66.18
DemocraticRaja Krishnamoorthi8,73633.82
Total votes25,833 100.0
Illinois 8th Congressional District General Election, 2012[122]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Tammy Duckworth 123,206 54.74
RepublicanJoe Walsh (incumbent)101,86045.26
Total votes225,066 100.0
Illinois 8th Congressional District General Election, 2014[123]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Tammy Duckworth (incumbent) 84,178 55.73
RepublicanLarry Kaifesh66,87844.27
Total votes151,056 100.0
Illinois U.S. Senator (Class III) Democratic Primary, 2016[124]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Tammy Duckworth 1,220,128 64.38
DemocraticAndrea Zopp455,72924.05
DemocraticNapoleon Harris219,28611.57
DemocraticPatricia Elaine Beard10.00
Total votes1,895,144 100.0
Illinois U.S. Senator (Class III) General Election, 2016[125]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Tammy Duckworth 3,012,940 54.86
RepublicanMark Steven Kirk (incumbent)2,184,69239.78
LibertarianKenton McMillen175,9883.20
GreenScott Summers117,6192.14
Write-in votesChad Koppie4080.01
Write-in votesJim Brown1060.00
Write-in votesChristopher Aguayo770.00
Write-in votesSusana Sandoval420.00
Write-in votesEric Kufi James Stewart50.00
Write-in votesPatricia Beard10.00
Total votes5,491,878 100.0
2021 election for Speaker – 117th Congress
* denotes incumbent
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Nancy Pelosi* (CA-12) 216 50.2%
RepublicanKevin McCarthy (CA-23)20948.6%
DemocraticTammy Duckworth10.2%
DemocraticHakeem Jeffries (NY-8)10.2%
Total votes427 100
Votes necessary214>50

Awards and accolades

In May 2010, Duckworth was awarded the Honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters (DHL) by Northern Illinois University.[126][127] In 2011, Chicago’s Access Living honored Duckworth for her work on behalf of veterans with disabilities, bestowing her with the Gordon H. Mansfield Congressional Leadership Award.[128]

Duckworth is heavily decorated for her service in Iraq, with over 10 distinct military honors, most notably the Purple Heart, an award her Marine father had also received.[32]

Former Republican presidential candidate and Senator from Kansas Bob Dole dedicated his autobiography One Soldier’s Story in part to Duckworth.[129] Duckworth credits Dole for inspiring her to pursue public service, while she recuperated at Walter Reed Army Medical Center; although, in 2006, Dole endorsed Duckworth’s Republican opponent, Peter Roskam.[130]

Personal life

Duckworth has been married to Bryan Bowlsbey since 1993.[131] They met during Duckworth’s participation in the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps and later served together in the Illinois Army National Guard.[131] Bowlsbey, a Signal Corps officer, is also a veteran of the Iraq War.[131][132] Both have since retired from the armed forces.[133]

Duckworth and Bowlsbey have two daughters: Abigail, who was born in 2014,[134] and Maile, born in 2018.[135] Maile’s birth made Duckworth the first U.S. Senator to give birth while in office.[135][136] Former senator Daniel Akaka helped the couple with the naming of both daughters; Akaka died April 6, 2018, three days before Maile was born.[137] Shortly after Maile’s birth, a Senate rule change permitted senators to bring children under one year old on the Senate floor to breastfeed.[86] This was a symbolic moment for Duckworth, as she had previously introduced the bipartisan Friendly Airports for Mothers (FAM) Act to ensure new mothers access to safe, clean and accessible lactation rooms in airports.[49] The day after the rule change, Duckworth brought Maile with her during the casting of a Senate vote, making Duckworth the first senator to cast a vote while holding a baby.[86][88]

Duckworth helped establish the Intrepid Foundation to help injured veterans.[138]

Bibliography

See also

References

  1. ^ “ประกาศสำนักนายกรัฐมนตรี เรื่อง พระราชทานเครื่องราชอิสริยาภรณ์ให้แก่ชาวต่างประเทศ (พันตรีหญิง ลัดดา แทมมี ดั๊กเวิร์ด)” [Announcement of the Prime Minister’s Office on granting decorations to foreigners (Major Ladda Tammy Duckworth)] (PDF). Royal Thai Government Gazette (in Thai). January 15, 2010.
  2. ^ Duckworth, Ladda Tammy; Iskra, Darlene. “Ladda Tammy Duckworth Collection” – via memory.loc.gov.
  3. ^ a b O’Toole, Molly (May 14, 2012). “Unseen: Trailblazing Military Women Forced To Fight For Recognition, Equal Treatment”. The Huffington Post.
  4. ^ a b House, Jennifer Bendery (November 8, 2016). “Tammy Duckworth Takes Back Obama’s Illinois Senate Seat For Democrats”. The Huffington Post. Retrieved November 9, 2016.
  5. ^ Faulder, Dominic; Fang, Alex (July 30, 2020). “Asia watches as Bangkok-born Tammy Duckworth rises in US politics”. Nikkei Asia. Tokyo, Kapan.
  6. ^ Geraghty, Jim (July 10, 2020). “Tammy Duckworth Is Auditioning to Be Biden’s Running Mate”. National Review. New York, NY.
  7. ^ Maskell, Jack (November 14, 2011). “Qualifications for President and the “Natural Born” Citizenship Eligibility Requirement” (PDF). Federation of American Scientists. Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service. p. i. The weight of legal and historical authority indicates that the term “natural born” citizen would mean a person who is entitled to U.S. citizenship “by birth” or “at birth,” either by being born “in” the United States and under its jurisdiction, even those born to alien parents; by being born abroad to U.S. citizen-parents; or by being born in other situations meeting legal requirements for U.S. citizenship “at birth.”
  8. ^ O’Connor, Phillip (June 21, 2005). “Downed pilot finally hears uplifting words she awaited”. STLtoday.com. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  9. ^ a b O’Connor, Phillip (June 19, 2005). “Pilot flew Black Hawks to serve her country – and please her father”. STLtoday.com. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  10. ^ a b Kravitz, Derek. “Yes, Tammy Duckworth’s Family Has Served in the Military for Centuries”. ProPublica. Retrieved June 28, 2020.
  11. ^ Adam Weinstein (September–October 2012). “Nobody Puts Tammy Duckworth in a Corner”. Mother Jones. Retrieved January 4, 2012.
  12. ^ O’Connor, Joseph; Nguyen, Son (August 24, 2019). “US Senator is a woman who speaks Thai – Tammy Duckworth visits Thailand to foster American ties”. Thai Examiner. Retrieved July 8, 2020.
  13. ^ a b Chase, John (November 9, 2016). “Duckworth reaches pinnacle of Senate nearly 12 years to day after Iraq crash”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved November 13, 2016.
  14. ^ Felsenthal, Carol (May 11, 2012). Nothing to Lose’: Tammy Duckworth on Her Quest to Go to Congress”. Chicago. Retrieved April 6, 2019.
  15. ^ “JIS Alumni”. Jakarta Intercultural School. Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  16. ^ “Mau Sekolah Gratis di JIS? Begini Caranya”. SkyeGrid Media (in Indonesian). Retrieved January 8, 2020.
  17. ^ Daranciang, Nelson (October 19, 2007). “Duckworth still stands strong”. Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Honolulu, HI.
  18. ^ Duckworth, Tammy (2021). Every Day Is a Gift: A Memoir. New York, NY: Hachette Book Group. p. 33. ISBN 978-1-5387-1849-0 – via Google Books.
  19. ^ “Girl Scouts Welcomes All Alums Who Have Earned Its Highest Award into the Gold Award Girl Scout Family”. Girl Scouts of the USA. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  20. ^ Will Hoover (January 15, 2006). “Duckworth working to win”. The Honolulu Advertiser.
  21. ^ “U.S. Sen. Tammy Duckworth to Deliver GW Commencement Address”. GW Today. Washington, DC. February 21, 2017.
  22. ^ “Tammy Duckworth receives honorary doctoral degree from NIU”. NIU Today. DeKalb, IL. June 2, 2010.
  23. ^ “Countdown to commencement”. capella.edu. Archived from the original on April 16, 2015.
  24. ^ a b c Haskall, Bob (January 6, 2005). “U.S. Army National Guard Maj. Tammy Duckworth: Illinois Guard officer faces adversity with courage, concern for troops”. Defend America. U.S. Department of Defense. Archived from the original on July 11, 2007. Retrieved July 10, 2007.
  25. ^ Irwin, James (May 12, 2014). “University Honors Alumna Rep. Tammy Duckworth”. GW Today. George Washington University. Archived from the original on October 25, 2014. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  26. ^ Felder, Deborah G. (February 1, 2020). The American Women’s Almanac: 500 Years of Making History. Visible Ink Press. ISBN 9781578597116. Retrieved July 7, 2020 – via Google Books.
  27. ^ Hirst, Ellen Jean (January 24, 2013). “Local female veterans take sides on women in combat”. Chicago Tribune. Chicago, IL.
  28. ^ a b Paulson, Amanda (February 22, 2006). “For veteran Tammy Duckworth, latest fight is for a House seat”. Retrieved October 28, 2016 – via Christian Science Monitor.
  29. ^ “Illinois lieutenant governor honors Rotary Centennial and RI employee”. Rotary International. Archived from the original on June 8, 2007. Retrieved July 10, 2007.
  30. ^ Davey, Monica (November 28, 2008). “The New Team: Tammy Duckworth”. The New York Times. New York, NY.
  31. ^ Sexton, Connie; Camire, Dennis (March 17, 2005). “Can-do spirit rises from crash”. Honolulu Advertiser. Archived from the original on June 30, 2013. Retrieved August 22, 2012.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  32. ^ a b c d Shane, Leo, III (June 14, 2005). “The pedals were gone, and so were my legs”. Stars and Stripes.
  33. ^ Toth, Catherine E. (October 18, 2007). “Hawaii school honoring Iraq war vet grad”. The Honolulu Advertiser. Honolulu, HI.
  34. ^ “Duckworth Retires”. Public Affairs Office, Illinois National Guard. Archived from the original on October 20, 2014. Retrieved October 15, 2014.
  35. ^ “Mount Vernon Statue Honors Women Vets, Maj. Tammy Duckworth”. www.facebook.com. Retrieved November 12, 2016.
  36. ^ “Director L. Tammy Duckworth: Committed to Serving Country and Community”. Illinois Department of Veterans’ Affairs. Archived from the original on October 27, 2008. Retrieved November 12, 2008.
  37. ^ Sweet, Lynn (November 21, 2006). “Gov picks Duckworth for Veterans Affairs”. Chicago Sun-Times.
  38. ^ Abramson, Mark (October 20, 2008). “Veterans’ advocate promotes PTSD site”. Stars and Stripes.
  39. ^ Kuczka, Susan (September 18, 2008). “Official admits error using state van; Tammy Duckworth took time off from job as state Veterans Affairs director to attend a campaign event but ran into controversy”. Chicago Tribune. p. 1.
  40. ^ “Employee lawsuit pops up in Walsh-Duckworth race”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved July 20, 2015.
  41. ^ Kurt Erickson. “Duckworth whistleblower trial date set”. The Quad-City Times. Retrieved July 20, 2015.
  42. ^ “Morning Spin: Judge sets May date in Duckworth ‘retaliation’ lawsuit”. Chicago Tribune. March 23, 2016. Retrieved March 23, 2016.
  43. ^ a b Pearson, Rick (June 24, 2016). “Workplace lawsuit against Tammy Duckworth settled”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved June 28, 2016.
  44. ^ “Judge allows workplace case against Tammy Duckworth to go to trial”. Chicago Tribune. May 12, 2016. Retrieved May 13, 2016.
  45. ^ Team, Fox Illinois News (August 5, 2016). “Judge Vacates Rep. Duckworth’s Lawsuit”.
  46. ^ “Duckworth lawsuit not going to trial Monday”. August 12, 2016.
  47. ^ “Duckworth Tapped for VA Assistant Secretary” (Press release). United States Department of Veterans Affairs. February 3, 2009. Archived from the original on April 8, 2009. Retrieved April 3, 2009.
  48. ^ “Senate Confirms Duckworth’s Federal Nomination”. Associated Press. April 23, 2009. Retrieved January 4, 2012.
  49. ^ a b “About Tammy | U.S. Senator Tammy Duckworth of Illinois”. www.duckworth.senate.gov. Retrieved August 9, 2020.
  50. ^ “Tammy Duckworth Resigns At VA, Illinois Congressional Run Could Be In The Cards”. The Huffington Post. June 14, 2011. Retrieved February 5, 2016.
  51. ^ Zeleny, Jeff; Biemer, John (May 12, 2006). “Duckworth praised for stance on abortion: EMILY’S List backs congressional hopeful”. Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on October 19, 2012.
  52. ^ Biemer, John; Parsons, Christi (October 11, 2006). “Gun law heats up race for Congress”. Chicago Tribune.
  53. ^ Krol, Eric (October 11, 2006). “Duckworth takes aim at Roskam gun record”. Daily Herald.
  54. ^ “Election 2006 Results: State Races, Illinois”. CNN. Retrieved March 27, 2007.
  55. ^ Sneed, Michael (July 6, 2011). “Tammy Duckworth running for Congress again, in redrawn 8th”. Chicago Sun Times. Retrieved July 9, 2011.
  56. ^ Editorial board (October 8, 2012). “For the House: Duckworth”. Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on May 16, 2012.
  57. ^ Editorial board (October 8, 2012). “Endorsement: Duckworth over Walsh in 8th Congressional District”. Daily Herald.
  58. ^ Skiba, Katherine (July 3, 2012). “Walsh defends remarks on whether Duckworth is true hero”. Chicago Tribune.
  59. ^ “Duckworth Defeats Rep. Walsh In 8th Congressional”. CBS Chicago. November 2012. Archived from the original on November 9, 2012. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  60. ^ Duaa Eldeib (November 10, 2012). “Duckworth the first Asian-American from Illinois in Congress”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 4, 2013.
  61. ^ “Tammy Duckworth: The mother making history in the US Senate”. BBC News. January 27, 2018. Archived from the original on March 19, 2020. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  62. ^ Swenson, Kyle (January 27, 2018). “Tammy Duckworth will be the Senate’s first new mom, but she already has a record of blazing trails”. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 24, 2018. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  63. ^ Hinz, Greg (November 4, 2013). “Marine veteran to take on U.S. Rep. Duckworth”. Crain’s Chicago Business. Retrieved January 24, 2015.
  64. ^ “Illinois General Election 2014”. Illinois State Board of Elections. November 4, 2014. Retrieved February 24, 2015.
  65. ^ Santostefano, Melanie (January 5, 2013). “Tammy Duckworth Sworn in to Congress”. Palatine Patch. Retrieved February 5, 2016.
  66. ^ Kiene, Chelsea (April 4, 2013). “Tammy Duckworth Returns Portion Of Salary In Sequestration Solidarity”. The Huffington Post. Retrieved February 5, 2016.
  67. ^ Graham, D. A. (June 27, 2013). “Tammy Duckworth’s Impassioned Shaming of a Faux-Disabled Vet”. The Atlantic. Retrieved June 27, 2013.
  68. ^ Thompson, M. (June 27, 2013). “Service-Connected Dissembling”. Time. Retrieved June 27, 2013.
  69. ^ “Duckworth Scolds Contractor Over Phony “War Wound.
  70. ^ Gallardo, Michelle (March 30, 2015). “Tammy Duckworth Running Against Mark Kirk for US Senate”. Chicago ABC 7 Eyewitness News. Retrieved March 30, 2015.
  71. ^ Jordan, Karen (March 16, 2016). “Duckworth, Kirk win Illinois US Senate Primaries”. Chicago ABC 7 Eyewitness News. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  72. ^ Morin, Rebecca (October 29, 2016). “Human Rights Campaign revokes Mark Kirk endorsement”. Politico. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  73. ^ “HRC Revokes Endorsement Following Racist Comments of Senator Mark Kirk”. Human Rights Campaign. October 29, 2016. Archived from the original on February 2, 2017. Retrieved October 30, 2016.
  74. ^ “Obama’s appearance with this Illinois Senate candidate may be the exception and not the rule”. Washington Post. Retrieved August 9, 2020.
  75. ^ Pearson, Rick (November 9, 2016). “Duckworth claims victory over Kirk in U.S. Senate race”. Chicago Tribune. ISSN 2165-171X. OCLC 7960243. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved June 3, 2021.
  76. ^ “The Center for Effective Lawmaking”. University of Virginia & Vanderbilt University. Retrieved May 3, 2020.
  77. ^ “Highlights from the New 115th Congress Legislative Effectiveness Scores”. The Center for Effective Lawmaking. February 27, 2019. Retrieved May 3, 2020. Finally, we note those new freshmen lawmakers who are off to a promising start in their first two years, scoring in our “Exceeds Expectations” category in their first term in office. Research suggests that performance in a lawmaker’s freshman term is highly correlated with subsequent lawmaking effectiveness, as well as with their overall career trajectory.

    Among them are two Senators (out of the eleven Senators in their freshman class), John Kennedy of Louisiana and Tammy Duckworth of Illinois. Kennedy sponsored 26 bills, including four that passed the Senate and eventually became law, on issues ranging from national flood insurance and small business disaster loans to mandatory disclosure of corrupt practices among lobbyists. Duckworth shepherded three of her 45 proposed bills into law, including the Veterans Small Business Enhancement Act of 2018.

  78. ^ “Sen. Tammy Duckworth’s 2018 Report Card”. GovTrack. Retrieved July 12, 2020.
  79. ^ “Sen. Tammy Duckworth’s 2019 Report Card”. GovTrack. Retrieved July 12, 2020.
  80. ^ Powell, Robyn (April 3, 2018). “Sen. Tammy Duckworth Saves the Americans With Disabilities Act—For Now”. Rewire.News. Retrieved July 12, 2020.
  81. ^ Duckworth, Tammy (October 17, 2017). “Congress wants to make Americans with disabilities second-class citizens again”. The Washington Post. Retrieved July 12, 2020.
  82. ^ Duckworth, Tammy (March 28, 2018). “Joint Letter to Majority Leader Opposing H.R. 620” (PDF). Retrieved July 12, 2020.
  83. ^ “PVA announces Senator Duckworth as recipient of 2019 Gordon Mansfield Congressional Leadership Award”. Paralyzed Veterans of America. September 17, 2019. Retrieved July 12, 2020.
  84. ^ Carter, Brandon (January 20, 2018). “Duckworth slams Trump: I won’t be lectured on military needs by a ‘five-deferment draft dodger. The Hill. Retrieved January 20, 2018.
  85. ^ Wamsley, Laurel (April 9, 2018). “Tammy Duckworth Becomes First U.S. Senator To Give Birth While In Office”. NPR. Archived from the original on April 9, 2018. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  86. ^ a b c d Serfaty, Sunlen (April 17, 2018). “Duckworth proposes rule allowing babies on Senate floor”. CNN. Retrieved September 5, 2020.
  87. ^ Serfaty, Sunlen (April 19, 2018). “Babies now allowed on Senate floor after rule change”. CNN.
  88. ^ a b Viebeck, Elise (April 20, 2018). “A duckling onesie and a blazer: The Senate floor sees its first baby, but many traditions stand”. The Washington Post. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  89. ^ Levine, Marianne; Ferris, Sarah; Zanona, Melanie (April 16, 2020). “White House taps members of Congress to advise on reopening economy”. Politico. Retrieved April 16, 2020.
  90. ^ “Democratic US Senator opposes Amy Coney Barrett confirmation over IVF”. Catholic News Agency. October 7, 2020. Retrieved October 9, 2020.
  91. ^ “Highlights from the New 116th Congress Legislative Effectiveness Scores”. Sen. Tammy Duckworth is also in her first term as a U.S. Senator. Looking back to the previous Congress, it is worth noting that she was one of only two freshmen Senators in the 115th Congress who was designated to be in our “Exceeds Expectations” categories, and she continues to retain that rating into the 116th Congress, in which she rounds out the top five most effective Democratic lawmakers in the Senate.
  92. ^ “DUCKWORTH AMONG CENTER FOR EFFECTIVE LAWMAKING’S “MOST EFFECTIVE” DEMOCRATIC SENATORS”. March 11, 2021.
  93. ^ Bremer, Shelby (January 8, 2021). “16 Members of Congress From Illinois Support Trump’s Removal From Office”. NBC Chicago. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  94. ^ Kapos, Shia (January 8, 2021). “Freshman lawmaker hit with colleagues’ fury after Hitler comments”. POLITICO. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  95. ^ “Members”. Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  96. ^ “Conventions 2008 – the Democrats”. The Washington Post. Retrieved August 26, 2008.
  97. ^ Burns, Alexander (August 21, 2012). “Ledbetter, Baldwin, Longoria to address Dem convention”. Politico. Retrieved August 22, 2012.
  98. ^ Pearson, Rick (September 4, 2012). “Duckworth touts Obama record at DNC convention”. articles.chicagotribune.com. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  99. ^ “Democratic National Convention Announces 2020 Convention Officers, Schedule of Events”. 2020 Democratic National Convention. July 30, 2020. Archived from the original on August 4, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  100. ^ Carney, Jordain (August 20, 2020). “Duckworth blasts Trump as ‘coward in chief. The Hill. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  101. ^ Tammy Duckworth (August 20, 2020). Duckworth calls Trump ‘coward in chief’. Politico. Event occurs at 2:07. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  102. ^ Reston, Maeve (August 2, 2020). “Top Biden VP contenders face sexist tropes, intense scrutiny in final stretch”. CNN.
  103. ^ Dan Merica, Jeff Zeleny and Kate Sullivan (January 14, 2021). “Biden names Jaime Harrison as his pick for DNC chair”. CNN.
  104. ^ Green, Miranda (April 5, 2019). “Bipartisan senators want ‘highest possible’ funding for carbon capture technology”. The Hill.
  105. ^ Pat Corcoran (August 17, 2006). “Duckworth calls for investigation of foreign spending since 9/11”. Northbrook Star. Archived from the original on August 21, 2006.
  106. ^ Biemer, John (October 1, 2006). “Duckworth: Bush has slogans, not strategies on Iraq”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  107. ^ Baxter, Sarah (October 22, 2006). “War heroine leads Democrat charge”. The Sunday Times.
  108. ^ “Illinois’s Jewish community praises VP contender Tammy Duckworth”. Jewish Insider. July 29, 2020.
  109. ^ Mr. Rubio (for himself, Mr. Cardin, Mr. Cotton, Mr. Kaine, Mr. Young, Mr. Blumenthal, Mr. Hawley, Mrs. Gillibrand, Mr. Scott of Florida, Mr. Manchin, Mrs. Blackburn, Ms. Duckworth, Mr. Cornyn, Mr. Jones, and Mr. Romney) (May 23, 2019). “Text – S.1634 – 116th Congress (2019-2020): South China Sea and East China Sea Sanctions Act of 2019 – Congress.gov – Library of Congress”. Congress.gov. 116th United States Congress. Archived from the original on April 24, 2020. Retrieved June 28, 2020. A BILL To impose sanctions with respect to the People’s Republic of China in relation to activities in the South China Sea and the East China Sea, and for other purposes.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  110. ^ Ghosh, Nirmal (May 24, 2019). “US Bill reintroduced to deter China in South China, East China seas”. The Straits Times.
  111. ^ Blanchard, Ben (June 6, 2021). “U.S. boosts Taiwan’s COVID-19 fight with vaccines as senators visit”. Reuters. Taipei. Retrieved June 6, 2021.
  112. ^ Taijing Wu; Zen Soo (June 6, 2021). “US senators promise vaccines for Taiwan amid China row”. The Washington Post. Associated Press. Archived from the original on June 6, 2021. Retrieved June 6, 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  113. ^ “Tammy Duckworth on Gun Control”. On The Issues. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  114. ^ a b c Nelson, Rebecca (September 29, 2016). “The Dark Humor of Tammy Duckworth, Iraq War Hero and Gun Control Advocate”. GQ. Retrieved October 4, 2017.
  115. ^ Slevin, Peter (February 19, 2006). “After War Injury, an Iraq Vet Takes on Politics”. The Washington Post. Retrieved July 20, 2015.
  116. ^ Pathe, Simone (August 25, 2015). “Another Democrat Gets in Race to Replace Duckworth”. Roll Call. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  117. ^ a b Skiba, Katherine (March 3, 2016). “Duckworth’s rebound paved by help from Democrats in high places”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  118. ^ Weixel, Nathaniel (August 15, 2018). “Senate Dems demand immediate reunification of remaining separated children”. The Hill.
  119. ^ “Election Results 2006 GENERAL PRIMARY”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 6, 2019.
  120. ^ “Election Results 2006 General Election”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 6, 2019.[permanent dead link]
  121. ^ “Election Results 2012 GENERAL PRIMARY”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 6, 2019.[permanent dead link]
  122. ^ “Election Results 2012 General Election”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 6, 2019.
  123. ^ “Election Results 2014 General Election”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 6, 2019.
  124. ^ “Election Results 2016 GENERAL PRIMARY”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 6, 2019.
  125. ^ “Election Results 2016 General Election”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 6, 2019.[permanent dead link]
  126. ^ “NIU to award honorary degree to ‘a true American hero. Northern Illinois University. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved August 29, 2010.
  127. ^ “Honorary Degrees Recipients – NIU – Division of Academic Affairs”. Northern Illinois University.
  128. ^ Meyer, Karen (June 19, 2007). “Duckworth to be honored for commitment to disabled veterans”. ABC-7 Chicago. Archived from the original on June 4, 2011. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  129. ^ Sneed, Michael (August 20, 2006). “Did you know”. Chicago Sun-Times.
  130. ^ Biemer, John (September 29, 2006). “Dole makes it clear: He backs Roskam over Duckworth”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved October 20, 2006.
  131. ^ a b c Fergus, Mary Ann (June 29, 2007). “Duckworth on homefront as husband off to war”. Chicago Tribune. Chicago, IL.
  132. ^ Brown, Mark (February 14, 2007). “Duckworth’s husband Iraq-bound”. Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on February 24, 2007. Retrieved March 27, 2007.
  133. ^ Laviola, Erin (August 20, 2020). “Tammy Duckworth’s Husband, Bryan Bowlsbey: 5 Fast Facts”. Heavy.com. New York, NY.
  134. ^ Skiba, Katherine (November 20, 2014). “Rep. Tammy Duckworth gives birth to daughter”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  135. ^ a b Anapol, Avery (April 9, 2018). “Duckworth gives birth to baby girl”. TheHill. Retrieved April 9, 2018.
  136. ^ Stevens, Heidi (January 24, 2018). “Tammy Duckworth expecting 2nd child; will be 1st sitting senator to give birth”. chicagotribune.com. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  137. ^ Stack, Liam (April 9, 2018). “Tammy Duckworth Becomes First U.S. Senator to Give Birth While in Office”. The New York Times. Retrieved April 10, 2018.
  138. ^ Haglund, Alex (June 27, 2011). “Duckworth, Pitcher honored along with all women veterans in Mt. Vernon”. Advocate-Press. Retrieved February 5, 2016.

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Roy Dolgos
Director of the Illinois Department of Veterans Affairs
2006–2009
Succeeded by
Daniel Grant
Preceded by
Lisette Mondello
Assistant Secretary of Veterans Affairs for Public and Intergovernmental Affairs
2009–2011
Succeeded by
Michael Galloucis
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Joe Walsh
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois’s 8th congressional district

2013–2017
Succeeded by
Raja Krishnamoorthi
Party political offices
Preceded by
Alexi Giannoulias
Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from Illinois
(Class 3)

2016
Most recent
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
Mark Kirk
U.S. Senator (Class 3) from Illinois
2017–present
Served alongside: Dick Durbin
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Todd Young
United States senators by seniority
77th
Succeeded by
Maggie Hassan