Mike BostMike Bost – IL12

Current Position: US Representative for IL District 12 since 2015
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 1995 – 2015

Featured Quote: 
“I am a true believer that local control is better. I believe that our school boards should be able to make decisions on their own. I am not a big government person, and the only concern I have is that the fact is, the governor is taking a very strong step for local control,” Bost said.

Featured Video: 
Bost Speaks Against H.R. 1 mar. 6, 2021

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Representative Mike Bost (IL-12) today voted against House Democrats’ legislation to federalize state election laws, establish the Attorney General as an “elections czar,” and give the Biden Administration the authority to veto states’ voter ID laws.

“Earlier this year, the Washington Democrats failed to get their federal election takeover signed into law, so they are trying once again,” said Bost. “The Supreme Court has ruled that the U.S. Constitution provides each state the right to regulate their own elections, not the federal government. This is a fundamental principle of federalism. We can all agree on the importance of ensuring the integrity of our elections, but what House Democrats want is to nationalize our state and local elections and give unelected Washington bureaucrats power over state election laws.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for IL District 12 since 2015
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): State Delegate from 1995 – 2015

Featured Quote: 
“I am a true believer that local control is better. I believe that our school boards should be able to make decisions on their own. I am not a big government person, and the only concern I have is that the fact is, the governor is taking a very strong step for local control,” Bost said.

Featured Video: 
Bost Speaks Against H.R. 1 mar. 6, 2021

News

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Representative Mike Bost (IL-12) today voted against House Democrats’ legislation to federalize state election laws, establish the Attorney General as an “elections czar,” and give the Biden Administration the authority to veto states’ voter ID laws.

“Earlier this year, the Washington Democrats failed to get their federal election takeover signed into law, so they are trying once again,” said Bost. “The Supreme Court has ruled that the U.S. Constitution provides each state the right to regulate their own elections, not the federal government. This is a fundamental principle of federalism. We can all agree on the importance of ensuring the integrity of our elections, but what House Democrats want is to nationalize our state and local elections and give unelected Washington bureaucrats power over state election laws.”

Twitter

About

Mike Bost 1

Source: Government page

Rep. Mike Bost is proud to represent the 12 counties of Illinois’ 12th District in the U.S. House of Representatives.  Sworn into office on January 6, 2015, Mike is continuing the fight for our Southern Illinois’ values in Washington – a fight he began in U.S. military, then as a first responder, a local job creator, and a state representative.

In the 117th Congress, Rep. Bost serves on two key committees: Veterans’ Affairs, and Transportation & Infrastructure.  On the Veterans’ Affairs Committee he serves as the Ranking Member, the top Republican on the Committee.

Prior to his election to Congress, Rep. Bost served for two decades in the Illinois House of Representatives, rising to the leadership position of House Republican Caucus Chair.

Rep. Bost also served as a firefighter for the Murphysboro Fire Department.   He graduated from the University of Illinois’ Certified Firefighter II Academy in 1993 and continued to serve the Murphysboro Fire Department during his six terms as state representative.  Prior to that, Rep. Bost worked for 13 years at Bost Trucking Service, first as a driver and then for 10 years as a truck manager.

Rep. Bost is a lifelong resident of Murphysboro.  He graduated from Murphysboro High School in 1979.   After high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps serving his country from 1979 to 1982.   He was trained as an electronic specialist and radar repairman and received an honorable discharge as a Corporal E-4.

In addition to his duties as a Member of Congress, Rep. Bost is very active in his church and community.   Rep. Bost and his wife, Tracy, own and operate a small business – the White House Salon – in Murphysboro.

Mike and Tracy have three children – Steven, Kasey Fred and Kaitlin Rose.  They have two sons-in-law, Travis Fred and Chad Rose, a daughter-in-law, Betsy, and eleven grandchildren.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

  • Bipartisan Congressional Pro-Life Caucus
  • Caucus for the Human Bond
  • Congressional Addition, Treatment, and Recovery Caucus
  • Congressional Air Force Caucus
  • Congressional Automotive Performance and Motorsports Caucus
  • Congressional Biofuels Caucus
  • Congressional Border Security Caucus
  • Congressional Chemistry Caucus
  • Congressional Congenital Heart Caucus
  • Congressional Corrosion Prevention Caucus
  • Congressional Defense Communities Caucus
  • Congressional Diabetes Caucus
  • Congressional Dyslexia Caucus
  • Congressional Farmer’s Cooperative Caucus
  • Congressional Fertilizer Caucus
  • Congressional Fire Services Caucus – Co-Chairman
  • Congressional House Manufacturing Caucus
  • Congressional Long Range Strike Caucus
  • Congressional Mississippi River Caucus
  • Congressional Motorsports Caucus
  • Congressional National Guard & Reserve Components Caucus
  • Congressional Pilots Caucus
  • Congressional Rural Broadband Caucus
  • Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus
  • Congressional Steel Caucus – Vice Chairman
  • Congressional Tuesday Group
  • Congressional Veterans Job Caucus
  • Congressional Youth ChalleNGe Caucus
  • House Congressional Mobility Air Forces Caucus
  • House General Aviation Caucus
  • House Republican Policy Committee
  • House Republican Study Committee
  • House Rural Education Caucus
  • House Rural Health Care Coalition
  • Republican Main Street Partnership
  • United Service Organizations Congressional Caucus

Offices

WASHINGTON

1211 Longworth House Office Building
WashingtonDC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-5661
Fax: (202) 225-0285

O’FALLON

302 West State Street
O’FallonIL 62269

Phone: (618) 622-0766
Fax: (618) 622-0774

CARBONDALE

300 East Main Street
Hunter Building-Suite 4
CarbondaleIL 62901

Phone: (618) 457-5787
Fax: (618) 457-2990

ALTON

Satellite Office
Click here for more information

GRANITE CITY

Satellite Office
Click here for more information

MT. VERNON

Satellite Office
Click here for more information

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets – We Follow the Money

Voting Record

VoteSmart – Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Michael Joseph Bost (/ˈbɔːst/; born December 30, 1960)[2] is an American politician. A member of the Republican Party, he has served as the U.S. representative for Illinois’s 12th congressional district since 2015. From 1995 to 2015, Bost was a member of the Illinois House of Representatives, representing the 115th district. Before holding elected office, he was a firefighter.

Early life and career

Bost was raised Baptist[3] and graduated from Murphysboro High School.[4] He attended a firefighter academy program offered by the University of Illinois, later becoming a firefighter. Bost did not complete a college degree. He served in the United States Marine Corps from 1979 to 1982.[5]

Bost ran his family’s trucking business for ten years. Since 1989, he and his wife Tracy have owned and operated White House Beauty Salon in Murphysboro.[6]

Bost was a member of the Jackson County Board from 1984 to 1988, the treasurer of Murphysboro Township from 1989 to 1992, and trustee of Murphysboro Township from 1993 to 1995, until his election to the Illinois House of Representatives.[2]

Illinois State Legislature

Bost was first elected to the Illinois House of Representatives in November 1994, having lost his first campaign in 1992. In his 1994 campaign against incumbent Gerald Hawkins, he was endorsed by the Chicago Tribune.[1]

During the 2008 Republican Party presidential primaries, Bost worked on former U.S. Senator Fred Thompson‘s presidential campaign, serving as a congressional district chair for Illinois’s 12th congressional district.[7]

In May 2012, members of the Illinois House were given just 20 minutes to review and vote on a 200-page pension overhaul bill that had been revised at the last minute. Displeased with the situation, Bost exploded on the House floor, saying, “These damn bills that come out of here all the damn time…at the last second and I’ve got to try figure out how to vote for my people!…Enough! I feel like somebody trying to be released from Egypt! Let my people go!” An opponent ran ads focusing on Bost’s anger, but many voters, according to NPR, “see his fury as well-placed.”[8][9][10] Bost’s rant earned him the runner-up spot on CNN‘s list of “Best Celebrity Flip-Outs of All-Time”.[11] He joked about his inclusion on the list, saying “I thought I was going to be No. 1”,[12] and later said he had been “angry at how legislators pushed a bill through and how Governor Pat Quinn was running Illinois.”[13]

In November 2013, Bost presented fellow U.S. Marine Archibald Mosley with Illinois House Resolution 706 for his lifetime accomplishments, including being among the first African-Americans to serve in the Marines. The presentation was part of a NAACP program.[14][15]

After the 2014 elections, Bost resigned early from the House to take office in Congress.[16] He was succeeded by Terri Bryant.[17]

Committees

Bost served on the following state legislative committees:[18]

  • Appropriations-Higher Education
  • Bio-Technology
  • Higher Education
  • Public Utilities

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2014

In 2014 Bost ran for U.S. Congress in Illinois’s 12th congressional district. He was unopposed in the Republican primary, and faced the incumbent, William Enyart, in the general election.[19]

Illinois’s largely agricultural 12th district was historically Democratic-leaning, but had been trending Republican, with President Obama having carried it by only 2 percentage points in 2012. Enyart was considered vulnerable as a freshman member in a competitive seat. Additionally, Democratic Governor Pat Quinn, who was running for reelection in 2014, was unpopular in the district.[12] The Cook Political Report rated the race a “Toss Up” and the National Journal ranked the district the 21st most likely to flip Republican in 2014.[12][20]

In a radio interview, Bost said some scientists believe in anthropogenic climate change while other scientists do not.[21]

Bost said he ran because “the federal government has basically blown everything they are doing right now.” He said he intended to fight for job growth and immigration reform.[22] Bost challenged Enyart to as many as a dozen debates.[23]

Bost was endorsed by the Illinois Chamber of Commerce.[24]

Bost won the election with 53% of the vote to Enyart’s 42%, with independent candidate Paula Bradshaw taking 6%.[25] He won primarily by dominating the areas of the district outside the St. Louis suburbs, taking all but three of the district’s 12 counties.[26] He also benefited from the coattails of Bruce Rauner‘s successful run for governor; Rauner carried every county in the district.

After being elected to the House, Bost said he did not plan to acquire a second residence, but would sleep in his office while in Washington.[13]

2016

Bost ran for reelection in 2016. He was unopposed in the Republican primary, and faced Democrat C.J. Baricevic and Green Party candidate Paula Bradshaw in the general election.[27] Bost won the November 8 general election with 54% of the vote.[28]

Bost was endorsed by the Illinois Education Association, Illinois’s largest labor union. In its endorsement, the union cited Bost’s “strong record in support of public education in the Metro East and Southern Illinois.”[29]

2018

Bost ran for reelection in 2018. In the Republican primary, he defeated challenger Preston Nelson with 83.5% of the vote. In the general election, Bost defeated Democratic nominee Brendan Kelly with 51.8% of the vote to Kelly’s 45.2%. Green Party candidate Randy Auxier took 3%.[30]

Tenure

Bost was sworn into office on January 6, 2015.[31]

In November 2014, Bost described President Obama, his former colleague in the Illinois legislature, as a “fluke” and said that “nobody ever thought he was going to rise.” He recalled a time when Obama, speaking to a group of reporters as Bost walked by, had said to them: “There you have it, one of the rich Republicans.” Bost purportedly responded, “that just proves you don’t know me at all.” He said that was his last exchange with Obama.[13]

After James Hodgkinson shot at GOP congressmen who were playing baseball in Virginia on June 14, 2017, injuring Steve Scalise, Bost said that his office has previously received phone calls from the attacker. “He’s contacted us just about 10 times, on every issue,” Bost said. “[He] was argumentative, but never threatening.”[32]

Bost is a member of the moderate Republican Main Street Partnership[33] and the conservative Republican Study Committee.[34]

At a March 2017 meeting with editors of the Southern Illinoisan, Bost said that he did not do “town halls” because they had become too combative. “You know the cleansing that the Orientals used to do where you’d put one person out in front and 900 people yell at them? That’s not what we need. We need to have meetings with people that are productive.” His use of the word “Orientals” made national headlines. Bost apologized, saying he had “used a poor choice of words.” His spokesman said that Bost had been referring to public humiliation sessions during China‘s Cultural Revolution.[35][36]

Farming

In April 2016, a Bost bill to change how the government defines farms and ranches as small businesses passed the House with bipartisan support.[37]

Health care

At a March 2017 “telephone town hall,” Bost spoke about health care with several constituents who criticized Obamacare. Bost expressed support for the new American Health Care Act, saying, “doing nothing is not an option.” He promised the new bill did not portend a return to pre-Obama health care. “It’s not intended to go back to what it was prior to the Affordable Care Act,” Bost said. “We have to move forward because the system is collapsing.” He also praised “plans to strip money from Planned Parenthood and shift it to local health departments that help with women’s needs.”[38] On May 4, 2017, Bost voted for the act.[39]

Tax reform

Bost voted for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017,[40] saying he believed the bill would enable businesses to compete globally and thereby improve the economy. The individual tax cuts expire in 2022. Bost wants to make them permanent.[41]

In December 2017, Bost signed a letter requesting that two education-related portions of the Internal Revenue code, one providing tuition breaks and the other incentivizing employees “to accept tax-free educational assistance from employers,” be left unchanged in the new tax bill. The letter pointed out that seven out of ten college students graduate with student loan debt, which “harms our economy because it prevents many young adults from buying a house, purchasing a car or saving for retirement.”[42]

Cannabis

Bost has a “D” rating from marijuana legalization advocacy organization the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) for his voting history regarding cannabis-related causes.[43]

Texas v. Pennsylvania

In December 2020, Bost was one of 126 Republican members of the House of Representatives to sign an amicus brief in support of Texas v. Pennsylvania, a lawsuit filed at the United States Supreme Court contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election, in which Joe Biden defeated[44] incumbent Donald Trump. The Supreme Court declined to hear the case on the basis that Texas lacked standing under Article III of the Constitution to challenge the results of an election held by another state.[45][46][47]

On January 6[48] and 7,[49] 2021, Bost objected to and refused to accept the presidential election results of 2020, and attempted to overturn the results of the election by voting to reject Arizona‘s and Pennsylvania‘s electoral votes.[citation needed]

LGBT rights

In 2015, Bost condemned the Supreme Court ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges, which held that same-sex marriage bans violated the constitution.[50]

In 2021, Bost was one of 29 Republicans to vote to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act.[51] This bill expanded legal protections for transgender people, and contained provisions allowing transgender women to use women’s shelters and serve time in prisons matching their gender identity.[52]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Electoral history

Illinois 115th State House District General Election, 1992[58]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Gerald Hawkins 22,494 54.61
RepublicanMike Bost18,70045.39
Total votes41,194 100.0
Illinois 115th State House District General Election, 1994[59]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost 17,004 56.21
DemocraticGerald Hawkins (incumbent)13,24543.79
Total votes30,249 100.0
Illinois 115th State House District General Election, 1996[60]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 19,561 51.82
DemocraticJohn S. Rendleman18,18848.18
Total votes37,749 100.0
Illinois 115th State House District General Election, 1998[61]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 18,523 55.11
DemocraticDon Strom15,08744.89
Total votes33,610 100.0
Illinois 115th State House District General Election, 2000[62]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 24,137 62.70
DemocraticRobert L. Koehn14,36237.30
Total votes38,499 100.0
Illinois 115th State House District General Election, 2002[63]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 20,338 60.55
DemocraticGerald Deering11,10233.05
Illinois Green PartyRich Whitney2,1506.40
Total votes33,590 100.0
Illinois 115th State House District General Election, 2004[64]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 27,984 59.99
DemocraticMic Middleton14,80431.74
GreenRich Whitney3,8598.27
Total votes46,647 100.0
Illinois 115th State House District General Election, 2006[65]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 23,289 77.87
GreenCharlie Howe6,62022.13
Total votes29,909 100.0
Illinois 115th State House District General Election, 2008[66]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 26,506 57.54
DemocraticCheryl Graff16,51535.85
GreenCharlie Howe3,0416.60
Total votes46,062 100.0
Illinois 115th State House District General Election, 2010[67]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 22,820 74.43
GreenCharlie Howe7,83925.57
Total votes30,659 100.0
Illinois 115th State House District General Election, 2012[68]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 37,192 100.0
Total votes37,192 100.0
Illinois 12th Congressional District General Election, 2014[69]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost 110,038 52.46
DemocraticWilliam L. “Bill” Enyart (incumbent)87,86041.89
GreenPaula Bradshaw11,8405.65
Total votes209,738 100.0
Illinois 12th Congressional District General Election, 2016[70]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 169,976 54.31
DemocraticCharles “C.J.” Baricevic124,24639.69
GreenPaula Bradshaw18,7806.00
Total votes313,002 100.0
Illinois 12th Congressional District Republican Primary, 2018[71]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 31,658 83.50
RepublicanPreston Nelson6,25816.50
Total votes37,916 100.0
Illinois 12th Congressional District General Election, 2018[72]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mike Bost (incumbent) 134,884 51.57
DemocraticBrendan Kelly118,72445.39
GreenRandy Auxier7,9353.03
Total votes261,543 100.0

Personal life

Bost and his wife, Tracy, have three children and 11 grandchildren. He has said that his political hero is John Alexander Logan, an Illinois Democrat who had switched parties when the Civil War began. “He was willing to break ranks to do what was right,” Bost explained.[13]

References

  1. ^ a b “Final Illinois House Endorsements”. Chicago Tribune. October 21, 1994. Retrieved May 22, 2014.
  2. ^ a b “BOST, Mike”. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress; retrieved April 2, 2015.
  3. ^ “Illinois-12: Mike Bost (R)”. NationalJournal.com. Retrieved March 16, 2015.
  4. ^ Moser, Whet (May 31, 2012). “The Politics of Mike Bost’s Pension Rant: Upstate, Downstate”. Chicago Magazine. Retrieved August 21, 2014.
  5. ^ “Representative Mike Bost (R)”. Illinois General Assembly. Retrieved August 21, 2014.
  6. ^ Vaughn, Lindsey Rae (July 10, 2014). “Candidate makes stops in Union County”. Gazette-Democrat. Retrieved July 11, 2014.
  7. ^ Peters, Gerhard; Woolley, John T., eds. (November 8, 2007). “Press Release: Thompson Campaign Announces Illinois Leadership Team”. The American Presidency Project. University of California, Santa Barbara. Retrieved August 20, 2021.
  8. ^ Mcceland, Jacob; Ranting And Throwing Papers: An Angry Candidate Runs For Congress; NPR; October 25, 2014; https://www.npr.org/sections/itsallpolitics/2014/10/25/358712314/ranting-and-throwing-papers-an-angry-candidate-runs-for-congress
  9. ^ “Bost rant on House floor goes viral”. The Southern. May 30, 2012.
  10. ^ “Watch: Ill. lawmaker loses cool over pension bill”. CBS News. May 30, 2012.
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  14. ^ Mariano, Nick (November 25, 2013). “Salute to success: NAACP gather for banquet; reminder of work that remains”. The Southern. Retrieved July 11, 2014.
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  17. ^ (January 2, 2015) – “Murphysboro’s Bryant Sworn In As State Rep”, Murphysboro American; retrieved January 3, 2015.
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  28. ^ Wall, Tobias (November 8, 2016). “Bost holds off Baricevic, Bradshaw in 12th Congressional District”. Belleville News-Democrat. Retrieved November 11, 2016.
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  32. ^ Esters, Stephanie; U.S. Rep. Mike Bost’s office had contact with suspect in shooting that wounded congressman; The Southern Illinoisan; June 14, 2017; http://thesouthern.com/news/national/u-s-rep-mike-bost-s-office-had-contact-with/article_09ba8b17-449f-5599-82a5-6870a1e0ff93.html
  33. ^ “Members”. Republican Mains Street Partnership. Archived from the original on August 26, 2018. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  34. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  35. ^ Phillips, Kristine; ‘The cleansing’ by ‘the Orientals’: Lawmaker uses offensive term to describe raucous town halls; Washington Post; March 4, 2017; https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/wp/2017/03/04/illinois-rep-mike-bost-said-raucous-town-halls-are-like-the-cleansing-by-the-orientals/
  36. ^ Illinois Rep. Mike Bost compares town halls to “cleansing” by “Orientals”; CBS News; March 3, 2017; https://www.cbsnews.com/news/illinois-rep-mike-bost-compares-town-halls-to-cleansing-by-orientals/
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  38. ^ Bustos, Joseph; Bost talks health care, Russia, NGA during telephone town hall; Belleville News Democrat; March 15, 2017; http://www.bnd.com/news/local/article138811038.html
  39. ^ Aisch, Gregor (May 4, 2017). “How Every Member Voted on the House Health Care Bill”. New York Times. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  40. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (December 19, 2017). “How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  41. ^ Richard, Brandon. “Congressman Bost predicts tax law will become more popular”. WSIL3. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  42. ^ Smith, Isaac; Rep. Mike Bost signs letter opposing plan to tax graduate stipends; The Southern Illinoisan; December 14, 2017; http://thesouthern.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/rep-mike-bost-signs-letter-opposing-plan-to-tax-graduate/article_df947f9d-24a6-59b0-9f5e-815259f8a3e0.html
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  70. ^ “Election Results 2016 GENERAL ELECTION”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 4, 2019.[permanent dead link]
  71. ^ “Election Results 2018 GENERAL PRIMARY”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 4, 2019.[permanent dead link]
  72. ^ “Election Results 2018 GENERAL ELECTION”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 4, 2019.[permanent dead link]

External links

Illinois House of Representatives
Preceded by

Gerald Hawkins
Member of the Illinois House of Representatives
from the 115th district

1995–2015
Succeeded by

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois’s 12th congressional district

2015–present
Incumbent
Preceded by

Ranking Member of the House Veterans’ Affairs Committee
2021–present
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
205th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure

House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs

Legislation

Learn more about legislation sponsored and co-sponsored by Congressman Bost.

Issues

X
Rodney DavisRodney Davis – IL13

Current Position: US Representative for IL District 13 since 2013
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Political staffer from 1994 – 2019

Featured Quote: 
The @SBAgovhas approved a disaster declaration for McLean County and contiguous counties following historic flooding in June. A declaration opens up loans and financial assistance for those affected.

Featured Video: 
Rep. Rodney Davis on Biden’s approach to infrastructure spending

U.S. Representative Rodney Davis (R-Ill.) today announced that Archers-Daniel-Midland (ADM) in Decatur will receive a $3,466,844 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office for biofuels research. The goal of the research to take place at ADM is to improve availability of data that will support bioprocessing separations development, as well as to develop supporting technologies to improve bioprocessing separations. More details on the project can be found here.

This award is one of 22 nationwide totaling $64.7M in an effort to develop technologies and processes that produce low-cost, low-carbon biofuels for heavy-duty forms of transportation like airplanes and ships.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for IL District 13 since 2013
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): Political staffer from 1994 – 2019

Featured Quote: 
The @SBAgovhas approved a disaster declaration for McLean County and contiguous counties following historic flooding in June. A declaration opens up loans and financial assistance for those affected.

Featured Video: 
Rep. Rodney Davis on Biden’s approach to infrastructure spending

News

U.S. Representative Rodney Davis (R-Ill.) today announced that Archers-Daniel-Midland (ADM) in Decatur will receive a $3,466,844 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office for biofuels research. The goal of the research to take place at ADM is to improve availability of data that will support bioprocessing separations development, as well as to develop supporting technologies to improve bioprocessing separations. More details on the project can be found here.

This award is one of 22 nationwide totaling $64.7M in an effort to develop technologies and processes that produce low-cost, low-carbon biofuels for heavy-duty forms of transportation like airplanes and ships.

Twitter

About

Rodney Davis 1

Source: Government page

Rodney Davis is currently serving his fifth term in Congress representing the 13th District of Illinois, which covers a 14-county region that includes both urban and rural communities in central and southwestern Illinois. Congressman Davis serves on the Committee on House Administration, where he is the Ranking Member, the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, where he is the Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Highways and Transit, and the House Committee on Agriculture.

During his time in Congress, Davis has worked with his colleagues on both sides of the aisle to be an effective lawmaker. The Lugar Center & Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy’s Bipartisan Index ranked Davis as the most bipartisan member of Congress from the state of Illinois and the 14th most bipartisan nationwide in the 116th Congress. Prior to being elected to the U.S. House in 2012, Davis served as Projects Director for Congressman John Shimkus for 16 years helping Illinois citizens and communities cut through government red tape and secure federal funding. Davis resides in Taylorville with his wife, Shannon, and their three children, Toryn, Clark, and Griffin.

Committees:
House Committee on Agriculture – Subcommittees: Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit; and Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research
House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure – Subcommittees: Highways & Transit (Ranking Member); and Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials
Committee on House Administration (Ranking Member)

Illinois’ 13th District: 14-county district covering both urban and rural areas of central and southwestern Illinois
Elected: Assumed office January 3, 2013, currently serving 5th Term
Prev. Political Exp.: Projects Director for Rep. John Shimkus (IL-15)
Education: B.A. Millikin University, 1992
Family: Married, 3 Children

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Offices

Washington, DC Office
2079 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
P: 202.225.2371
Hours: Monday – Friday, 9:00am – 6:00pm
Champaign District Office
2004 Fox Drive
Champaign, IL 61820
P: 217.403.4690
Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 5:00pmDecatur District Office
243 S Water Street
Suite 100
Decatur, IL 62523
P: 217.791.6224
Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 5:00pmEdwardsville District Office
1012 Plummer Drive, Suite 205
Edwardsville, IL 62025
P: 618.205.8660
Hours: Monday-Friday, 8:30am-5:00pm

Normal District Office
104 W. North Street
Normal, IL 61761
P: 309.252.8834
Hours: By appointment only

Taylorville District Office
108 W. Market St.
Taylorville, IL 62568
P: 217.824.5117
Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:30am – 5:00pm

Springfield District Office
2833 S Grand Ave. East
Springfield, IL 62703
P: 217.791.6224
Hours: By appointment only

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

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Campaign Finance

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Voting Record

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Wikipedia Entry

Rodney Lee Davis (born January 5, 1970)[1] is an American Republican politician who has been the U.S. representative for Illinois’s 13th congressional district since 2013.

Early life and education

Davis was born in Des Moines, Iowa.[1] He graduated from Millikin University in 1992 with a degree in political science.[2]

Early political career

In 1996, he lost a race for the state legislature.[3] In 1998, Davis managed Illinois Congressman John Shimkus‘s first reelection campaign. After the successful campaign, he accepted a position on Shimkus’s congressional staff.[4]

In 2000, Davis lost his campaign for mayor of Taylorville, Illinois.[3] Davis served as Shimkus’s projects director while running for Congress.[5]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2012

On May 19, 2012, the Republican County Chairmen for the 14 Illinois counties the 13th district comprises nominated Davis as the Republican candidate for Congress. This district had previously been the 15th, represented by six-term incumbent Republican Tim Johnson. Johnson had announced in April that he would not seek reelection, just days after winning the Republican primary. Other finalists for the nomination were Jerry Clarke, chief of staff to fellow U.S. Representative Randy Hultgren and Johnson’s former chief of staff; Erika Harold, a lawyer and winner of Miss America in 2003; and Kathy Wassink, a businesswoman.[5] Davis was coaching his sons’ little league baseball game when he was informed that he had been nominated.[6] His home in Taylorville had previously been in Shimkus’s 19th District (which had been renumbered as the 15th). But the new 13th had absorbed much of the old 19th’s northern portion, including Taylorville.

In the general election, Davis defeated Democratic nominee David M. Gill by 1,002 votes (0.3%). Independent candidate John Hartman received around 21,000 votes (7.2%).[7]

2014

On June 13, 2013, former Miss America Erika Harold announced she would run against Davis in the March 18 Republican primary.[8]

The Republican field included Davis, Harold, and Michael Firsching.[9] Davis won the primary with 55% of the vote.[9]

Davis faced Democratic nominee Ann Callis in the November 4 general election.[10] He was reportedly a top target for the Democrats[11] but won with 59% of the vote.[12][13]

2016

Davis was reelected in 2016, defeating Ethan Vandersand in the primary and Democratic nominee Mark Wicklund and independent David Gill in the general election.[14] He received 59.7% of the vote.[15]

2018

On March 20, 2018, Betsy Londrigan won the Democratic primary in District 13 with over 45% of the vote, beating Erik Jones, David Gill, Jonathan Ebel, and Angel Sides.[16]

In May 2018, the American Federation of Government Employees endorsed Davis for reelection. AFGE District 7 National Vice President Dorothy James said, “We hope that Representative Davis will continue his good work on Capitol Hill for years to come and are happy to announce our support for him today.”[17]

On November 6, Davis was reelected, 50.7% to 49.3%. He lost the district’s shares of Champaign, McLean, and Sangamon counties, but carried Christian and Macon Counties. His margins in both far exceeded his overall margin of 2,058 votes.[18]

During a debate, Davis said that The Washington Post fact-checker had found Londrigan’s claims about the impact of Obamacare’s repeal on preexisting conditions to be false. The Washington Post fact-checker responded, “Republicans are twisting an unrelated fact check and are misleading voters.”[19]

2020

Davis ran for a fifth term and was unopposed in the Republican primary. Londrigan ran again, and easily won the Democratic primary. Although most forecasters considered the race a tossup due to the close margin in 2018, Davis won reelection by 9 points.[20] His larger margin of victory was attributed to both an increase in turnout from the district’s Republican-leaning rural counties, and a decrease in the district’s college campuses. Londrigan attempted to tie Davis to President Trump, and he linked her to Illinois House Speaker and state Democratic Party chair Mike Madigan, who was broadly unpopular.[citation needed]

Trump’s 2020 presidential campaign named Davis one of four “honorary state chairs.”[21]

2022

After the 2020 United States census, Illinois Democratic legislators gerrymandered new congressional maps that eliminated Republican learning districts. Because Davis’s district became much more Democratic-leaning, he has opted to run instead in the 15th district, against the incumbent, Mary Miller.[22][23]

Tenure

Davis introduced the Hire More Heroes Act of 2013 into the House on November 13, 2013. The bill would allow employers to exclude veterans receiving health insurance from the United States Department of Defense or the United States Department of Veterans’ Affairs from their list of employees.[24][25] This would have had the effect of keeping their list of employees shorter, allowing some small businesses to fall underneath the 50 full-time employees line that would require them to provide their employees with healthcare under the Affordable Care Act.[25][26] Davis said that the bill “gives our small businesses another incentive to hire veterans, which helps to address the increasing number of unemployed veterans, while providing them with some relief from Obamacare.”[26]

Davis voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act.[27] He voted to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act.[28]

Davis voted for H.J.Res.59 – Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2014, which resulted in the Government Shutdown of 2013. After the vote, Politico reported that Davis also intended to vote for a bill that would end the shutdown, stressing that an agreement needed to be made and that “Like most of those I represent, I remain opposed to Obamacare, but a government shutdown is absolutely unacceptable.”[29][30][31][32][33]

Davis voted to lift a ban on travel to Cuba.[34] In June 2016, he cast the deciding vote on a bill to continue to allow undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children to join the U.S. military. The program would give those who serve a quicker pathway to citizenship.[34]

During the 115th Congress, Davis was a member of the Republican Main Street Partnership and chaired the Republican Main Street Caucus.[35]

During the presidency of Donald Trump, Davis voted in line with Trump’s stated position 88.8% of the time.[36] As of September 2021, Davis had voted in line with Joe Biden‘s stated position 25.7% of the time.[37]

On May 4, 2017, Davis voted again to repeal the Affordable Care Act and pass the American Health Care Act (AHCA).[38][39]

Davis voted for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[40] He said the bill would improve the economy without increasing the deficit, and that Americans would see “more money in the pockets” by February 2018 as a result of the bill.[41]

In June 2018, Davis said, “we’ve got to stop this politicizing everything like dinner”, adding, “Donald Trump was elected, in my opinion, because of this move toward making everything politically correct in this country.”[42]

On December 18, 2019, Davis voted against both articles of impeachment against Trump.[43]

On January 6, 2021, Davis was at the U.S. Capitol to certify the Electoral College vote count when Trump supporters stormed the building. Davis and his staff went into hiding under police lockdown for over four hours during the attack.[44] After the Capitol was secure and Congress resumed session, Davis certified the election without objection.[45] As a result of the attack, Trump was impeached a second time. Davis voted against impeachment, saying, “there must be accountability for leaders who deliberately misled the public, but I fear that without thoughtful and clear-eyed leadership from both sides of the aisle, we are in danger of further violence and political unrest.”[46] In the wake of the attack, metal detectors were placed outside the House chamber. Davis objected to them.[47][48]

On May 19, 2021, Davis was one of 35 Republicans who joined all Democrats in voting to approve legislation to establish the January 6 commission meant to investigate the storming of the U.S. Capitol.[49]

In July 2021, Davis was among five Republicans selected by Republican Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy to serve on the Select Committee on the January 6 Attack on the Capitol. After Speaker Nancy Pelosi rejected two of the selections, McCarthy pulled all five, including Davis.[50][51]

In November 2021, Davis voted against censuring Paul Gosar, a House member who had shared an animated video of himself killing a fellow member of Congress and assaulting the president. When a majority of the House voted to censure Gosar, Davis criticized Pelosi, saying she had “torn the fabric of this House apart”.[52]

Committee memberships

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Cannabis

Davis has a “B” rating from NORML for his voting record on cannabis-related causes. He supports veterans having access to medical marijuana if recommended by their Veterans Health Administration doctor and if it is legal for medicinal purposes in their state. He supports industrial hemp farming and medical marijuana research.[57][failed verification]

Economy

In April 2018, Davis expressed concern about the impact of proposed tariffs on Illinois soybean farmers and other Illinois agricultural workers, but was glad that Trump had given “a lot of free rein” to Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. Davis highlighted unfair trade practices by China and noted the adverse effect on the domestic steel industry.[58] In June, he reiterated concern about some of Trump’s proposed tariffs’ impact on his constituents as well as their impact on certain foreign countries. Although he felt “the president was right to actually address the steel discrepancy that he saw from countries like China”, he wished that Trump “would focus on…actors like China rather than punishing our allies”.[59]

Gun policy

In March 2018, in the wake of the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting, Davis said the shooting could have been prevented if the perpetrator had been charged with a felony for bringing a gun to school earlier. Davis said he believed more funding should be directed to mental health programs and that loopholes in background checks should be closed, but that he did not see banning guns as a solution.[60]

Immigration

In June 2018, Davis said he hoped to co-sponsor a bill that would address the separation of adult illegal immigrants at the Mexican border from the children accompanying them. He expressed optimism that Congress could come up with a compromise on the issue.[42]

In 2021, Davis voted for the Farm Workforce Modernization Act of 2021, which passes work visas for farm workers.[61]

Davis supports DACA.[62]

Davis voted for the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2020, which authorizes DHS to nearly double the available H-2B visas for the remainder of FY 2020.[63][64]

Davis voted for the Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 1158), which effectively prohibits ICE from cooperating with Health and Human Services to detain or remove illegal alien sponsors of unaccompanied alien children (UACs).[65]

Abortion

Davis opposes abortion except in cases of rape or incest or to protect the health of the mother.[66]

Foreign policy

Davis was one of 129 House Republicans who voted to condemn President Donald Trump’s withdrawal from Syria.[67]

In 2021, Davis voted against the repeal of the 2002 Authorization of Military Force against Iraq.[68]

Vaccination

Davis voted for the Immunization Infrastructure Modernization Act of 2021. The bill helps create confidential, population-based databases that maintain a record of vaccine administrations.[69]

LGBT rights

In 2019 and in 2021, Davis voted against the Equality Act.[70]

In 2015, Davis was one of 60 Republicans voting to uphold President Barack Obama’s 2014 executive order banning federal contractors from making hiring decisions that discriminate based on sexual orientation or gender identity.[citation needed]

In 2016, Davis was one of 43 Republicans to vote for the Maloney Amendment to H.R. 5055, which would prohibit the use of funds for government contractors who discriminate against LGBT employees.[71]

In 2021, Davis was one of 29 Republicans to vote to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act.[72] This bill expanded legal protections for transgender people, and contained provisions allowing transgender women to use women’s shelters and serve time in prisons matching their gender identity.[73]

In 2021, Davis was one of 33 Republicans to vote for the LGBTQ Business Equal Credit Enforcement and Investment Act.[74]

Electoral history

2012 Illinois’s 13th congressional district election[75]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Rodney Davis 137,034 46.55
DemocraticDavid M. Gill136,03246.21
IndependentJohn Hartman21,3197.24
Total votes294,385 100.0
2014 Illinois’s 13th congressional district election – Republican primary[76]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Rodney Davis (incumbent) 27,816 54.63
RepublicanErika Harold20,95141.15
RepublicanMichael Firsching2,1474.22
Total votes50,914 100.0
2014 Illinois’s 13th congressional district election[77]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Rodney Davis (incumbent) 123,337 58.66
DemocraticAnn E. Callis86,93541.34
Total votes210,272 100.0
2016 Illinois’s 13th congressional district election – Republican primary[78]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Rodney Davis (incumbent) 71,447 76.95
RepublicanEthan Vandersand21,40123.05
Total votes92,848 100.0
2016 Illinois’s 13th congressional district election[79]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Rodney Davis (incumbent) 187,583 59.66
DemocraticMark D. Wicklund126,81140.34
Total votes314,394 100.0
2018 Illinois’s 13th congressional district election[80]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Rodney Davis (incumbent) 136,516 50.38
DemocraticBetsy Dirksen Londrigan134,45849.62
Write-in votesThomas J. Kuna (Jacob)70.00
Total votes270,981 100.0

Personal life

Davis and his wife Shannon wed in 1995, and live in Taylorville, Illinois.[81] They have three children.[5]

Davis coached Taylorville Junior Football, is a member of the Taylorville Optimist Club, and serves on the Christian County Senior Center’s board of directors.[1] He plays catcher for the GOP team in the Congressional Baseball Game.[82][83]

On August 5, 2020, Davis was diagnosed with COVID-19.[84]

References

  1. ^ a b c “Rodney Davis’ Biography”. Project Vote Smart. Retrieved May 27, 2016.
  2. ^ “Congressman Rodney Davis ’92 returns to Millikin as part of Constitution Week”. Millikin University. September 19, 2017.
  3. ^ a b “DAVIS profile”. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  4. ^ Gangitano, Alex (June 23, 2016). “Staffer Member Duo Turned Catcher Pitcher Teammates”. Roll Call. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c Petty, Allison (May 19, 2012). “GOP picks Rodney Davis to face Gill”. Bloomington Pantagraph.
  6. ^ “GOP chooses Davis for US Rep. Tim Johnson’s seat”. Associated Press. May 19, 2012.
  7. ^ “Ballots Cast”. Illinois State Board of Election. Retrieved May 27, 2016.
  8. ^ Last, Jonathan V. “Miss America vs. Mr. Incumbent”. The Weekly Standard.
  9. ^ a b Official Illinois State Board of Elections Results Archived January 28, 2015, at the Wayback Machine. Retrieved March 3, 2015.
  10. ^ Cahn, Emily (March 18, 2014). “Ann Callis, Rodney Davis to Face Off in Targeted Illinois District”. Roll Call. Retrieved March 19, 2014.
  11. ^ Camia, Catalina. Ex-Miss America Erika Harold begins campaign for Congress, USA Today, June 4, 2013; retrieved March 3, 2015.
  12. ^ “Illinois General Election 2014”. Illinois State Board of Elections. November 4, 2014. Archived from the original on December 15, 2014. Retrieved March 3, 2015.
  13. ^ Kacich, Tom “Davis: ‘An Opportunity’ for Republicans”, The News Gazette, November 5, 2014; retrieved May 27, 2016.
  14. ^ Kacich, Tom (July 19, 2016). “Davis has monumental advantage in campaign money”. The News-Gazette. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  15. ^ “2016 Illinois House Election Results”. Politico. Retrieved January 8, 2017.
  16. ^ “Illinois’ 13th Congressional District election, 2018 – Ballotpedia”. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  17. ^ AFGE Endorses Rep. Rodney Davis for Reelection; PR Newswire; May 22, 2018; https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/afge-endorses-rep-rodney-davis-for-reelection-300653010.html
  18. ^ 2018 election results from CNN
  19. ^ “Analysis | These Republicans are misleading voters about our Obamacare fact checks”. Washington Post. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  20. ^ “How Rep. Rodney Davis Won So Handily In The 13th Congressional District”. WGLT.
  21. ^ Pearson, Rick (October 2, 2019). “U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis among ‘honorary state chairs’ for Trump reelection”. Herald-Review.com. Retrieved March 16, 2021.
  22. ^ Burnett, Sara (October 28, 2021). “Illinois Democrats embrace gerrymandering in fight for US House”. STLtoday.com. Retrieved November 22, 2021.
  23. ^ Axelrod, Tal (January 1, 2022). “GOP Rep. Mary Miller announces reelection bid with Trump endorsement”. The Hill. Archived from the original on January 1, 2022. Retrieved January 1, 2022.
  24. ^ “H.R. 3474 – Summary”. United States Congress. Retrieved March 10, 2014.
  25. ^ a b Hultgren, Randy (January 13, 2014). “Let’s Give Jobs to Veterans: Hultgren Supports Hire More Heroes Act”. Osqego Patch. Retrieved March 11, 2014.
  26. ^ a b Kasperowicz, Pete (March 10, 2014). “GOP eyes Dem help on ObamaCare”. The Hill. Retrieved March 11, 2014.
  27. ^ Mike Fitzgerald (December 3, 2013). “Health care glitches put twist on local congressional races”. BND.com. Archived from the original on April 16, 2014.
  28. ^ Bill Lambrecht (May 20, 2013). “In Illinois, Davis preparing for marathon race for Congress”. St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
  29. ^ “FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 504”. Retrieved October 19, 2014.
  30. ^ “H.J.Res.59 – Continuing Appropriations Resolution, 2014”. December 26, 2013. Retrieved October 30, 2014.
  31. ^ ISENSTADT, ALEX (October 1, 2013). “Vulnerable Republicans: End the shutdown”. Politico. Retrieved October 31, 2014.
  32. ^ “Legislation-Joint Resolution – Concurrence Vote Passed (House) (228-201) – Sept. 30, 2013”. Project Vote Smart. Retrieved October 31, 2014.
  33. ^ “How Rodney Davis voted on key votes”. Washington Post. Retrieved October 31, 2014.
  34. ^ a b Raasch, Chuck (July 4, 2016). “Rep. Rodney Davis is a Republican with an occasional twist”. St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  35. ^ Vas, Nicole (November 9, 2017). “Is there room for another GOP caucus? Main Street chairman says yes”. TheHill. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  36. ^ Bycoffe, Aaron (January 30, 2017). “Tracking Rodney Davis In The Age Of Trump”. FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved July 5, 2018.
  37. ^ Bycoffe, Anna Wiederkehr and Aaron (April 22, 2021). “Does Your Member Of Congress Vote With Or Against Biden?”. FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved September 14, 2021.
  38. ^ “How the House voted to pass the GOP health-care bill”. Washington Post. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  39. ^ CNN Staff (May 4, 2017). “How every member voted on health care bill”. CNN. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  40. ^ Almukhtar, Sarah (December 19, 2017). “How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill”. The New York Times. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  41. ^ Wolfe, Doug. “Davis: Tax cut money will not come from Medicare”. WAND17. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  42. ^ a b Rep. Davis “optimistic” House will vote on family separation policy; MSCNBC; June 24, 2018; https://www.msnbc.com/kasie-dc/watch/rep-davis-optimistic-house-will-vote-on-family-separation-policy-1263091779556
  43. ^ “Here’s how the House voted on Trump’s impeachment”. POLITICO. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  44. ^ Beckett, Donnette (January 6, 2021). “Watch now: Rep. Rodney Davis on Capitol raid: ‘A sad day for our country’. The Pantagraph. Retrieved January 14, 2021.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  45. ^ Szalinski, Ben (January 7, 2021). “How Illinois’ Congressional delegation voted on Electoral College objections”. The State Journal-Register. Retrieved January 14, 2021.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  46. ^ Petty, Allison (January 13, 2021). “In his own words: Why U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis voted against Trump impeachment”. Herald Review. Retrieved January 14, 2021.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  47. ^ “Congressman Rodney Davis among Republicans angry about U.S. House metal detectors,” Daily Pantagraph/Associated Press”. January 12, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  48. ^ “Republican Illinois congressman uses expletive to describe extra security at Capitol,” Belleville News-Democrat”. January 13, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  49. ^ LeBlanc, Paul (May 19, 2021). “Here are the 35 House Republicans who voted for the January 6 commission”. CNN. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  50. ^ Grayer, Annie; Zanona, Melanie. “Jim Jordan Among 5 House Republicans Selected by McCarthy for January 6 Select Committee”. CNN. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  51. ^ Grayer, Annie; Herb, Jeremy. “McCarthy Pulls his 5 GOP Members from 1/6 Committee After Pelosi Rejects 2 of his Picks”. CNN. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  52. ^ Weisman, Jonathan; Edmondson, Catie (November 17, 2021). “House, Mostly Along Party Lines, Censures Gosar for Violent Video”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 18, 2021.
  53. ^ “Member Profiles: Rodney Davis”. Office of the Clerk, US House of Representatives. Retrieved July 27, 2021.
  54. ^ “90 Current Climate Solutions Caucus Members”. Citizen´s Climate Lobby. Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  55. ^ Vas, Nicole (November 9, 2017). “Is there room for another GOP caucus? Main Street chairman says yes”. TheHill. Retrieved May 24, 2020.
  56. ^ “Members of the Veterinary Medicine Caucus”. Veterinary Medicine Caucus. Retrieved October 12, 2018.
  57. ^ “Illinois Scorecard”. NORML. Retrieved December 27, 2017.
  58. ^ Davis Discusses Unfair Trade with China on CNN; CNN; April 6, 2018 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qI4P4YSPE2A
  59. ^ Rep. Davis Wants Trump to Focus on ‘Bad Actors’ Like China; Bloomberg; June 27, 2018; https://www.bloomberg.com/news/videos/2018-06-27/rep-davis-wants-trump-to-focus-on-bad-actors-like-china-video
  60. ^ Schlenker, Charlie; Rodney Davis Stands Firm For Second Amendment; NPR; March 29, 2018; http://wglt.org/post/rodney-davis-stands-firm-second-amendment#stream/0
  61. ^ “Passes Path to Legal Status for… – H.R.1603: To amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to”. August 12, 2015.
  62. ^ https://news.wttw.com/sites/default/files/article/file-attachments/2017-12-05-DACA_Letter_1.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  63. ^ https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/1865/text?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B%22Further+Consolidated+Appropriations+Act%2C+2020%22%5D%7D&r=1&s=2
  64. ^ “Archived copy”. Archived from the original on November 18, 2021. Retrieved January 18, 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  65. ^ “H.R. 1158: DHS Cyber Hunt and Incident Response Teams Act … — House Vote #690 — Dec 17, 2019”.
  66. ^ Schoenburg, Bernard (October 6, 2020). “Davis, Londrigan clash on health care, abortion, taxes, campaign money”. The State Journal-Register. Retrieved October 20, 2020.
  67. ^ “Opposes Withdrawal of U.S. Forces in… – H.J.RES.77: Opposing the decision to end certain United”. August 12, 2015.
  68. ^ “On Passage – H.R.256: To repeal the Authorization for Use of Military”. August 12, 2015.
  69. ^ “H.R. 550: Immunization Infrastructure Modernization Act of 2021 — House Vote #388 — Nov 30, 2021”.
  70. ^ “The Voter’s Self Defense System”.
  71. ^ “H.Amdt. 1128 (Maloney) to H.R. 5055: Amendment, as offered, prohibits … — House Vote #258 — May 25, 2016”.
  72. ^ “Roll Call 86 Roll Call 86, Bill Number: H. R. 1620, 117th Congress, 1st Session”. Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives. March 17, 2021. Retrieved June 4, 2021.
  73. ^ Davis, Susan (March 17, 2021). “House Renews Violence Against Women Act, But Senate Hurdles Remain”. NPR. Retrieved June 4, 2021.
  74. ^ “H.R. 1443: LGBTQ Business Equal Credit Enforcement and Investment Act — House Vote #182 — Jun 24, 2021”.
  75. ^ “Election Results 2012 GENERAL ELECTION”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  76. ^ “Election Results 2014 GENERAL PRIMARY”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  77. ^ “Election Results 2014 GENERAL ELECTION”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  78. ^ “Election Results 2016 GENERAL PRIMARY”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  79. ^ “Election Results 2016 GENERAL ELECTION”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on March 8, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  80. ^ “Election Results 2018 GENERAL ELECTION”. Illinois State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on January 16, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2019.
  81. ^ “Profile”. Retrieved May 27, 2016.
  82. ^ “Rep. Joe Barton on congressional baseball game, GOP’s 7-year losing streak and Democratic superstar Cedric Richmond”. Retrieved June 14, 2017.
  83. ^ “Our 10 best photos from the 58th annual Congressional Baseball Game”. Roll Call. June 27, 2019. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  84. ^ Kapos, Shia. “Rep. Rodney Davis diagnosed with Covid days after warning lawmakers about safety”. POLITICO. Retrieved August 6, 2020.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois’s 13th congressional district

2013–present
Incumbent
Preceded by

Ranking Member of the House Administration Committee
2019–present
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
165th
Succeeded by


Issues

Committees

In Congress, Rodney serves on three committees and four subcommittees.

On the House Committee on Agriculture, he serves on the Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research and the Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit.

On the House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure, Rodney is the Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Highways and Transit, and also serves on the Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials.

Additionally, Rodney serves as Ranking Member of the Committee on House Administration.

Full Committee Assignment List

House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure
-Subcommittee on Highways and Transit (Ranking Member)
-Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines and Hazardous Materials

House Committee on Agriculture
-Subcommittee on Biotechnology, Horticulture, and Research
-Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

 

X
Mary Miller 1Mary Miller – IL15

Current Position: US Representative for IL 15th District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): US Senator

Featured Quote: 
I will not sit on the sidelines and watch our Constitution be trampled on. We are not descendants of the fearful.

Featured Video: 
Congresswoman Mary Miller Apologizes For Quoting Hitler In Speech Outside Capitol, Accuses Others Of

i

WASHINGTON – Congresswoman Mary Miller (IL-15) introduced the House companion bill to Senator Mike Braun’s (R-IN) Define WOTUS Act of 2021. This bill was introduced by Congresswoman Miller to prevent President Biden’s radical cabinet secretaries from telling farmers and ranchers how to use and regulate their own land.

During the Obama Administration, the definition of “Waters of the United States” was altered, which trampled on the property rights of farmers, ranchers, and landowners in rural America.

President Trump’s Navigable Waters Protection Rule provided long-overdue certainty and clarity for landowners affected by the scope of WOTUS’s jurisdiction.

“The Obama Administration vastly expanded the scope and power of the federal government in order to regulate and punish rural America,” Miller said. “This bill keeps unelected Washington bureaucrats off our farms and sends a clear message to the radical leftists in the Biden Administration that we will not allow them to trample on our rights.”

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for IL 15th District since 2021
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): US Senator

Featured Quote: 
I will not sit on the sidelines and watch our Constitution be trampled on. We are not descendants of the fearful.

Featured Video: 
Congresswoman Mary Miller Apologizes For Quoting Hitler In Speech Outside Capitol, Accuses Others Of

News

i

WASHINGTON – Congresswoman Mary Miller (IL-15) introduced the House companion bill to Senator Mike Braun’s (R-IN) Define WOTUS Act of 2021. This bill was introduced by Congresswoman Miller to prevent President Biden’s radical cabinet secretaries from telling farmers and ranchers how to use and regulate their own land.

During the Obama Administration, the definition of “Waters of the United States” was altered, which trampled on the property rights of farmers, ranchers, and landowners in rural America.

President Trump’s Navigable Waters Protection Rule provided long-overdue certainty and clarity for landowners affected by the scope of WOTUS’s jurisdiction.

“The Obama Administration vastly expanded the scope and power of the federal government in order to regulate and punish rural America,” Miller said. “This bill keeps unelected Washington bureaucrats off our farms and sends a clear message to the radical leftists in the Biden Administration that we will not allow them to trample on our rights.”

Twitter

About

Mary Miller

Source: Government page

Congresswoman Mary Miller (Oakland, Ill.) represents Illinois’ 15th District in the United States House of Representatives covering 33 counties. She is a wife, mother, grandmother, farmer, and business manager. Mary serves on the House Committee on Agriculture and House Committee on Education & Labor. She joins 45 new Republican members elected to the House for the 117th session of Congress.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

  • Freedom Caucus
  • Republican Study Committee

Offices

1529 Longworth House Office Building

Washington, DC  20515

Phone: (202) 225-5271
Fax: (202) 225-5880
101 North 4th St.
Suite 302

Effingham, IL  62401

Phone: (217) 240-3155
100 E. Locust Street

Harrisburg, IL  62946

201 North Vermilion Street
Suite 325

Danville, IL  61832

Phone: (217) 703-6100

Web

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Wikipedia Entry

Mary E. Miller (née Meyer; born August 27, 1959) is an American farmer and politician serving as the U.S. representative from Illinois’s 15th congressional district. She is a member of the Republican Party and serves on the House Committee on Agriculture and the House Committee on Education & Labor. Her term began on January 3, 2021.

Early life and education

Born in Oak Park, Illinois, to Annette and Harvey Meyer,[1][2] Miller graduated from Naperville Central High School in Naperville, Illinois.[3] She earned a Bachelor of Science in business management and did some graduate coursework in education at Eastern Illinois University, but did not complete a graduate degree.[4]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2020

Miller speaking at a Turning Point USA event in 2020

Miller announced her candidacy to represent Illinois’s 15th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives in the 2020 elections to succeed retiring incumbent John Shimkus.[5] She won the Republican Party nomination,[6] the real contest in the deeply Republican district, and won the general election with over 70% of the vote. She is the first Republican woman elected to represent Illinois in Congress since Judy Biggert left office in 2013.[7] Miller focused her campaign on providing support to farming and bringing manufacturing back to Illinois.[8]

Miller sided with President Donald Trump‘s false claims that the 2020 presidential election was compromised by voter fraud, calling it “tainted”.[9]

Tenure

On January 6, 2021, when Congress met to formally count the votes of the Electoral College and certify the results of the 2020 presidential election, Miller was one of the members of the House of Representatives who objected to the votes of Arizona and Pennsylvania.[10]

LGBT rights

On March 2, 2021, Miller introduced legislation for the Safety and Opportunity for Girls Act.[11]

Myanmar

On March 19, 2021, she was one of 14 House Republicans to vote against a measure condemning the Myanmar coup d’état that overwhelmingly passed, for reasons reported to be unclear.[12]

Capitol Police Medals

In June 2021, Miller was one of 21 House Republicans to vote against a resolution to give the Congressional Gold Medal to police officers who defended the U.S. Capitol on January 6.[13]

Iraq

In June 2021, Miller was one of 49 House Republicans to vote to repeal the AUMF against Iraq.[14][15]

Defense

In September 2021, Miller was among 75 House Republicans to vote against the National Defense Authorization Act of 2022, which contains a provision that would require women to be drafted.[16][17]

Miller was among 19 House Republicans to vote against the final passage of the 2022 National Defense Authorization Act.[18]

Ukraine

In February 2022, Miller co-sponsored the Secure America’s Borders First Act, which would prohibit the expenditure or obligation of military and security assistance to Kyiv over the U.S. border with Mexico.[19]

Comment about Hitler

On January 5, 2021, two days into her House term, Miller issued a prepared speech to the conservative group Moms for America.[20][21] She quoted Adolf Hitler, saying: “Each generation has the responsibility to teach and train the next generation. You know, if we win a few elections, we’re still going to be losing unless we win the hearts and minds of our children. This is the battle. Hitler was right on one thing: he said, ‘Whoever has the youth has the future.’”[22][23]

A number of groups and politicians condemned the comment, criticized Miller, and urged the Republican party to do likewise. Public statements were issued by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, Anti-Defamation League (ADL), World Jewish Congress, and multiple lawmakers including Adam Kinzinger and Illinois governor J. B. Pritzker.[24][25][26][27][28][29] U.S. representative Jan Schakowsky, U.S. senator Tammy Duckworth, and the Illinois legislative Jewish caucus called for Miller’s resignation.[30][28][25] On January 14, Schakowsky said that she would introduce a measure to censure Miller.[31] ADL midwest regional director David Goldenberg shared with Miller’s office a list of 12 anti-Semitic incidents and 17 instances of white supremacist propaganda in the 15th district in 2019 and 2020 in an effort to make Miller aware of “what was going on in and around her district”, he said, including information about extremist activity.[32]

On January 7, Miller’s office tweeted that her remarks had been intended to compare alleged youth indoctrination efforts by “left-wing radicals” to those of Hitler, while nonetheless encouraging Republicans to aggressively appeal to the youth as a means to collective power.[21] On January 8, Miller apologized for having quoted Hitler in the message, but accused critics of twisting her words.[20][33]

Reelection campaign

In May 2022, the Washington Examiner criticized Miller for employing Bradley Graven, “a man convicted of soliciting sex with a minor, to assist with her re-election campaign.”[34][35] Graven was also seen driving Miller around, raised money for her campaign, and was reportedly responsible for collecting over half the signatures needed to qualify her for the ballot.[34][36]

Caucus memberships

Personal life

Miller is married to fellow Republican politician Chris Miller. They own a farm in Oakland, near Charleston, where they grow grain and raise cattle. They have seven children and 17 grandchildren.[3][8] He has served as a member of the Illinois House of Representatives since 2019, representing most of the district’s eastern portion.[39] The Millers are members of Oakland Christian Church.[40][41]

References

  1. ^ “Miller, Mary E. (1959– )”. U.S. Congress. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  2. ^ “Mary Miller”. Our Campaigns. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  3. ^ a b Perry, Scott. “Oakland woman announces bid for 15th Congressional District seat | Government and Politics”. jg-tc.com. Retrieved June 9, 2020.
  4. ^ “The Voter’s Self Defense System”. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  5. ^ Joseph Bustos. Grain and cattle farmer from Oakland, Illinois, jumps into 15th District race. Belleville News-Democrat. 23, Oct 2019
  6. ^ Rubio, Karina (March 17, 2020). “Mary Miller to win Republican primary for Illinois 15th district”. WCIA.com. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  7. ^ “Republican Mary Miller wins election to U.S. House in Illinois’ 15th Congressional District | National/World News”. The News-Gazette. November 3, 2020. Retrieved November 16, 2020.
  8. ^ a b Stabile, Angelica (November 9, 2020). “13 GOP women join the House, dominating congressional elections, making history”. Fox News. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  9. ^ Sweet, Lynn (January 3, 2021). “After Trump call, Republican Kinzinger says no member of Congress can object to election with a ‘clean conscience’. Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved January 4, 2021.
  10. ^ Behrmann, Savannah; Santucci, Jeanine (January 14, 2021). “The Members of Congress Who Objected to Joe Biden’s Electoral College Win Amid Capitol Riot”. USA Today. Retrieved January 17, 2021.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  11. ^ Moore, Brenden (March 2, 2021). “Watch now: Rep. Mary Miller files bill that would require sex-segregated school bathrooms, sports teams”. The Southern Illinoisan.
  12. ^ Diaz, Daniella; Wilson, Kristin (March 19, 2021). “14 House Republicans vote against a measure condemning military coup in Myanmar”. CNN. Retrieved March 24, 2021.
  13. ^ Grayer, Annie; Wilson, Kristin (June 16, 2021). “21 Republicans vote no on bill to award Congressional Gold Medal for January 6 police officers”. CNN. Retrieved June 16, 2021.
  14. ^ “House votes to repeal 2002 Iraq War authorization”. NBC News.
  15. ^ “FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 172 | H R 256 YEA-AND-NAY 17-Jun-2021 11:27 AM | QUESTION: On Passage | BILL TITLE: To repeal the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002”. clerk.house.gov.
  16. ^ “House passes sweeping defense policy bill”. September 23, 2021.
  17. ^ “H.R. 4350: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022 — House Vote #293 — Sep 23, 2021”.
  18. ^ “S. 1605: National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022 — House Vote #405 — Dec 7, 2021”. GovTrack.us.
  19. ^ https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/6648?r=5&s=1
  20. ^ a b Pearson, Rick (January 8, 2021). “Rep. Mary Miller Apologizes for Using Adolf Hitler Reference in Speech, But Blames Others for Trying to Twist Her Words”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  21. ^ a b Pearson, Rick (January 7, 2021). “Newly Inaugurated Illinois GOP Congresswoman Claims She Was Attacking Democrats in Citing Adolf Hitler”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 8, 2021 – via Yahoo! News.
  22. ^ “Illinois Congresswoman Says ‘Hitler Was Right on One Thing’. NBC Chicago. January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  23. ^ McGowan Staebler, Margot (January 6, 2021). “Hitler was right,” Illinois Republican Mary Miller says”. Belleville News Democrat. Retrieved January 7, 2021.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  24. ^ Petrella, Lisa; Donovan, Dan (January 6, 2021). “Days after she was sworn in, Illinois U.S. Rep. Mary Miller facing criticism for invoking Adolf Hitler during speech in Washington”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  25. ^ a b Maxwell, Mark (January 7, 2021). “Duckworth calls on Congresswoman Miller to resign for quoting Hitler”. WGN-TV. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  26. ^ Miller, Steve (January 6, 2021). “Illinois congresswoman’s reference to Hitler condemned by Gov. Pritzker”. WBBM Radio.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  27. ^ Samuels, Ben (January 6, 2021). “Republican Congresswoman at pro-Trump Rally Near U.S. Capitol: ‘Hitler Was Right’. Haaretz. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021.
  28. ^ a b “Lawmakers, governor condemn Rep. Mary Miller’s ‘Hitler was right on one thing’ comment”. WCIA.com. January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  29. ^ Budryk, Zack (January 7, 2021). “Newly sworn-in Republican lawmaker condemned by Holocaust Museum after Hitler quote”. The Hill. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  30. ^ Sweet, Lynn; Boyle, Andy (January 6, 2021). “After Illinois Rep. Mary Miller praises Hitler, Rep. Jan Schakowsky calls on her to resign”. Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  31. ^ “Illinois Congresswoman Mary Miller, who quoted Hitler in speech, could be censured, fellow rep. says”. January 14, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  32. ^ “Months after congresswoman’s Hitler remarks, Jews’ in pain”. Daily Herald. Associated Press. April 24, 2021. Retrieved April 24, 2021.
  33. ^ “A poor start in Congress for Rep. Miller,” Tribune-Star Editorial Board”. January 25, 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  34. ^ a b “GOP House member draws fire over child sex predator’s reelection campaign role”. Washington Examiner. May 5, 2022. Retrieved May 5, 2022.
  35. ^ “Man lured `boy’on Net, cops say”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved May 6, 2022.
  36. ^ “Miller campaign volunteer was convicted for luring young boy for sex”. ksdk.com. May 4, 2022. Retrieved May 6, 2022.
  37. ^ “Who is Mary Miller, Republican representative for Illinois’ 15th Congressional District?”. Chicago Tribune. Retrieved February 28, 2021.
  38. ^ “Membership”. Republican Study Committee. December 6, 2017. Retrieved March 28, 2021.
  39. ^ “Mary Miller, wife of Rep. Chris Miller, to run in 15th Congressional District”. East Central Reporter. November 11, 2019. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  40. ^ “Meet Mary”. Mary Miller for Congress.
  41. ^ “Religious affiliation of members of 117th Congress” (PDF). www.pewforum.org. Pew Research Center.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Illinois’s 15th congressional district

2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
404th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

X
Adam KinzingerAdam Kinzinger – IL16

Current Position: US Representative for IL District 16 since 2012
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): US Air Force from 2003 – 2021

Featured Quote: 
It was a sobering moment to vote in support of impeachment today; to walk over to the U.S. Capitol, our symbol of democracy, and recall the violent insurrection we witnessed here just one week ago. This is not a vote I took lightly, but a vote I took confidently. I’m at peace.

Featured Video: 
Kinzinger BLASTS Kevin McCarthy for ‘childish’ comments on Jan. 6 committee

What’s next for Adam Kinzinger?
WILL, The 21st ShowNovember 3, 2021

Last week, Illinois Congressman Adam Kinzinger came out with a video announcing he would not be seeking re-election. There’s been speculation about him possibly running for governor or the US Senate here in Illinois — both of which would be uphill climbs just to win the primary. We talked about what the future might hold for Kinzinger with former leading conservative radio host and current editor-at-large of “The Bulwark.”

GUEST: 

Charlie Sykes

Founder and Editor-at-large, The Bulwark | Host, The Bulwark Podcast | Contributor, MSNBC | Author • “How the Right Lost Its Mind” (2017)

Kinzinger Letter Asks Full Scope of Afghanistan Evacuation
kinzinger.house.gov, Press ReleaseSeptember 1, 2021

WASHINGTON, DC – Following the announcement that the last U.S. troops had officially left Afghanistan, Congressman Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) sent a letter to Secretary of State, Antony Blinken and Secretary of Defense, Lloyd Austin to inquire about the evacuation process, the status of those left behind, and the plan moving forward.

While I commend the administration for saving thousands of lives, I believe more could have been done to prevent the tragic loss of life on August 26, 2021 and to better prepare for the chaos that ensued this last week. And I’m looking to our Secretaries of State and Defense to get to those answers,” said Congressman Kinzinger“Our military community stepped up in a way many can hardly grasp right now, but I am incredibly proud of the men and women who have served this mission and all those that risked life and limb to defend this nation and save the lives of our allies. This effort is not over and nor should it be. We can never give up until our fellow Americans and our allies are safe.”

The full text of the letter is available below and a signed copy can be found attached and on the Congressman’s website here.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for IL District 16 since 2012
Affiliation: Republican
Former Position(s): US Air Force from 2003 – 2021

Featured Quote: 
It was a sobering moment to vote in support of impeachment today; to walk over to the U.S. Capitol, our symbol of democracy, and recall the violent insurrection we witnessed here just one week ago. This is not a vote I took lightly, but a vote I took confidently. I’m at peace.

Featured Video: 
Kinzinger BLASTS Kevin McCarthy for ‘childish’ comments on Jan. 6 committee

News

What’s next for Adam Kinzinger?
WILL, The 21st ShowNovember 3, 2021

Last week, Illinois Congressman Adam Kinzinger came out with a video announcing he would not be seeking re-election. There’s been speculation about him possibly running for governor or the US Senate here in Illinois — both of which would be uphill climbs just to win the primary. We talked about what the future might hold for Kinzinger with former leading conservative radio host and current editor-at-large of “The Bulwark.”

GUEST: 

Charlie Sykes

Founder and Editor-at-large, The Bulwark | Host, The Bulwark Podcast | Contributor, MSNBC | Author • “How the Right Lost Its Mind” (2017)

Kinzinger Letter Asks Full Scope of Afghanistan Evacuation
kinzinger.house.gov, Press ReleaseSeptember 1, 2021

WASHINGTON, DC – Following the announcement that the last U.S. troops had officially left Afghanistan, Congressman Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) sent a letter to Secretary of State, Antony Blinken and Secretary of Defense, Lloyd Austin to inquire about the evacuation process, the status of those left behind, and the plan moving forward.

While I commend the administration for saving thousands of lives, I believe more could have been done to prevent the tragic loss of life on August 26, 2021 and to better prepare for the chaos that ensued this last week. And I’m looking to our Secretaries of State and Defense to get to those answers,” said Congressman Kinzinger“Our military community stepped up in a way many can hardly grasp right now, but I am incredibly proud of the men and women who have served this mission and all those that risked life and limb to defend this nation and save the lives of our allies. This effort is not over and nor should it be. We can never give up until our fellow Americans and our allies are safe.”

The full text of the letter is available below and a signed copy can be found attached and on the Congressman’s website here.

Twitter

About

Adam Kinzinger 1

Source: Government page

Adam D. Kinzinger is currently serving his sixth term in the United States House of Representatives and proudly represents Illinois’ Sixteenth Congressional District, which stretches across 14 counties in Northern Illinois.

Congressman Kinzinger serves as a member of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce and the House Foreign Affairs Committee. His top priorities include strengthening U.S. energy policy and making our nation less reliant on foreign resources as well as bolstering the strength of our national security – both at home and abroad.

The Sixteenth District is home to four nuclear power plants (the most of any district in America), miles of windmills, hydropower plants, and ethanol and biodiesel plants. The nuclear energy production alone employs more than 2,500 people throughout the 16th District.  Coal and natural gas are also vital to the region. With such rich energy resources, Congressman Kinzinger is focused on advancing energy production throughout the 16th District and across the United States.

Prior to being elected to Congress, Kinzinger served in the Air Force in both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom.  He has always been a strong supporter of U.S. leadership in the Middle East, and he was among the first members of Congress to call for airstrikes against ISIS. He continues to focus on eradicating this threat with a comprehensive and detailed strategy.

In 2007, he received the United States Air Force Airman’s Medal for saving the life of a young woman who was being violently attacked. He wrestled the knife away from the attacker and pinned him to the ground until the police arrived. He was also awarded the National Guard’s Valley Forge Cross for Heroism and was selected as the Southeastern Wisconsin American Red Cross Hero of the Year.

At the age of 42, Congressman Kinzinger is one of the youngest Members of Congress, yet he ranks in the top half of seniority in the full House of Representatives. He was named ‘A Republican Role Model for 2017’ by the Washington Post and is frequently applauded for his pragmatic approach to the myriad of issues facing America, and the world. 

Education and Early Career

As a 20-year old sophomore at Illinois State University (ISU), Adam Kinzinger challenged a three-term incumbent for the McLean County Board. He advocated for restoring local government back into the hands of the people and won a seat on the board, becoming one of the youngest county board members in McLean County history. He served on the McLean County Board from 1998-2003, and graduated from ISU in 2000.

Military Experience

After serving on the McLean County Board, Kinzinger joined the United States Air Force. He was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in November 2003 and later awarded his pilot wings. He has served in the Air Force Special Operations, Air Combat Command, Air Mobility Command, and Air National Guard.

Kinzinger continues to serve his country as a pilot in the Air National Guard, with the current rank of Lieutenant Colonel, and balances this service with his duties in Congress.

Family

Congressman Kinzinger’s roots run deep across Illinois. He was born in Kankakee, grew up in Bloomington, and now resides in Channahon. His mother Jodi is a retired elementary schoolteacher, and his father Rus is a former CEO of two faith-based organizations. His parents instilled in him and his two siblings the importance of hard work, compassion, and teamwork through their own service to their communities. Kinzinger carries these Midwestern values and his servant leadership with him to Washington, D.C. as he fights to preserve and promote the American dream for hardworking Illinoisans.

 

Major Accomplishments

During his time in Congress, Kinzinger has worked tirelessly for IL-16, and for the security of our nation. From getting veterans back to work, to combatting the opioid epidemic, Congressman Kinzinger continues to fight for his constituents and stand up for America. Some of the most notable efforts by Congressman Kinzinger include:

–          Public Law 113-235: The American Manufacturing Competitiveness Act, introduced by Reps. Kinzinger and Daniel Lipinski (D-IL), requires the President to create a national manufacturing strategy that will provide long-term guidance and certainty for United States manufactures and improve their coordination with the government.  This bill was signed into law in December 2014 (as part of the 2015 spending package).

–          Public Law 114-198: The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, signed into law in July 2016, was a landmark piece of legislation because it was the most comprehensive and first major federal addiction legislation in 40 years. Congressman Kinzinger served as a conferee on the final language, which established a coordinated and balanced strategy though grants that would expand prevention and education efforts about addiction, while also promoting more innovative research, treatment, and recovery methods.

o   The Veteran EMT Act, introduced by Congressman Kinzinger, was included in the final CARA legislation (Section 105). The measure provides grants to states so they can review their EMT certification process to consider the experience of veterans to issue certifications in a timelier fashion.

–          Public Law 115-141: The Improving Broadband Access for Veterans Act, introduced by Reps. Kinzinger and Jerry McNerney (D-CA), was signed into law in March 2018 as part of the Ray Baum’s Act (included in the 2018 Omnibus). This measure requires the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) to submit a report to Congress that will promote broadband access for veterans, especially low-income veterans and those residing in rural areas.

–          Public Law 115-254: The SEAT Act, introduced by Reps. Kinzinger and Steve Cohen (D-TN), was signed into law on October 5, 2018 as part of the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018. This legislation directs the Federal Aviation Administration to establish minimum standards for the size of seats on airplanes to ensure the health and safety of passengers.

–          Public Law 115-271: The SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Actsigned into law in October 2018, received strong bipartisan support in Congress because it included several provisions to combat the opioid epidemic, advance treatment and recovery initiatives, prevent addiction, and help protect communities affected by this drug crisis.

o   Included in this package was Congressman Kinzinger’s bill, H.R. 5590, the Opioid Addiction Action Plan, which requires the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) to present to Congress a proposal to better address the opioid crisis by being more adaptable to innovative treatments, and steer us away from the typical one-size-fits-all methods for treating pain and substance abuse disorder.

–          Public Law 115-398: The SOAR to Health and Wellness Act, introduced by Reps. Kinzinger and Steve Cohen (D-TN), was signed into law on December 31, 2018. The bill requires the implementation of standard procedures and programs to educate and train health care professionals to better identify and properly treat victims of human trafficking.

–          Public Law 115:439: The NUKE Act, introduced by Reps. Kinzinger and Mike Doyle (D-PA), will modify the licensing process for nuclear plants by creating a framework for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fees, increasing transparency and providing long-term certainty for these plants.

o   The bill signed into law, S.512, is a companion bill to the NUKE Act, titled the Nuclear Energy Innovation and Modernization Act.

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  • Congressional Cement Caucus
  • House Baltic Caucus
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  • Climate Solutions Caucus
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Offices

Washington DC Office

2245 Rayburn HOB
Washington, DC 20515

Phone: (202) 225-3635
Fax: (202) 225-3521

Hours: 9:00 AM – 6:00 PM EST

Ottawa District Office

628 Columbus Street, Ste. 507
Ottawa, IL 61350

Phone: (815) 431-9271
Fax: (815) 431-9383

Hours: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM CST

Watseka District Office

342 West Walnut
Watseka, IL 60970

Phone: (815) 432-0580

Hours: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM CST

Meetings by appointment

Rockford District Office

725 N. Lyford Road
Suite 3
Rockford, IL 61107

Phone: (815) 708-8032

Hours: Meetings by appointment only.

 

Contact

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Adam Daniel Kinzinger[1] (/ˈkɪnzɪŋər/; born February 27, 1978) is an American politician serving as the U.S. representative for Illinois’s 16th congressional district. The district covers eastern Rockford, most of Rockford’s suburbs, and a swath of exurban territory around Chicago. He is a member of the Republican Party. He is also a lieutenant colonel in the Air National Guard.

Kinzinger was first elected to Congress in 2010 from the 11th district. His district was largely merged with the 16th after the 2010 census, and Kinzinger transferred to the 16th after defeating its incumbent, Don Manzullo, in the Republican primary.

After President Donald Trump was defeated in the 2020 presidential election, Kinzinger became known for his vocal opposition to Trump’s claims of voter fraud and attempts to overturn the results. Kinzinger was one of the 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump for incitement of insurrection in his second impeachment, and one of only two Republicans to vote to create a select committee to investigate the 2021 attack on the U.S. Capitol, to which he was subsequently appointed.

On October 29, 2021, Kinzinger announced that he will not seek reelection to Congress in 2022.[2][3]

Early life, education, and early political career

Adam Kinzinger was born on February 27, 1978, in Kankakee, Illinois, the son of Betty Jo, an elementary school teacher, and Rus Kinzinger, a CEO of faith-based organizations.[4][5][6] After spending part of his youth in Jacksonville, Florida, he was primarily raised in Bloomington, Illinois. He graduated from Normal Community West High School in 1996[7] and earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from Illinois State University in 2000.[8]

In 1998, while a student at Illinois State, Kinzinger ran for election as a county board member in McLean County. He won, defeating an incumbent, and at age 20 was one of the youngest county board members in McLean County history,[9][10] Kinzinger remained on the board until resigning in 2003.[11]

Kinzinger worked as an intern for former U.S. Senator Peter Fitzgerald shortly after his graduation from Illinois State, as part of a program offered there.[12]

Military service

Kinzinger piloting a Boeing KC-135 StratoTanker during his service with the United States Air Force.

Kinzinger resigned from the McLean County Board in 2003 to join the United States Air Force. He was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in November 2003 and later awarded his pilot wings. Kinzinger was initially a KC-135 Stratotanker pilot and flew missions in South America, Guam, Iraq and Afghanistan. He later switched to flying the RC-26 surveillance aircraft and was stationed in Iraq twice.[13]

Kinzinger has served in the Air Force Special Operations Command, Air Combat Command, Air Mobility Command, and Wisconsin Air National Guard and was progressively promoted to his current rank of Lieutenant Colonel.[14] As part of his continued service with the Air National Guard, Kinzinger was deployed to the Mexico–United States border in February 2019 as part of efforts to maintain border security.[15]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

2010

Kinzinger met Republican U.S. Representatives Mike Pence, Mark Kirk, and Peter Roskam in January 2009 to discuss a possible run for Congress.[16] He decided to run in Illinois’s 11th congressional district, held by Debbie Halvorson. He started campaigning full-time in May 2009, when he returned home from his 3rd tour in Iraq. He was endorsed by former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin. Kinzinger won the five-candidate Republican primary on February 2, 2010, with 64% of the vote.[17]

He was endorsed by the Chicago Tribune and the Chicago Sun-Times in the general election. Kinzinger defeated Halvorson 57–43% on November 2, 2010.[18]

2012

Kinzinger (second from right) at the Halifax International Security Forum.

During his first term, Kinzinger represented a district that stretched from the outer southern suburbs of Chicago to Bloomington/Normal.

After redistricting, Kinzinger’s district was eliminated. Much of its eastern portion, including Kinzinger’s home in Channahon, near Joliet, was merged with the Rockford-based 16th District, represented by fellow Republican Don Manzullo, a 67-year-old politician first elected in 1992. Before redistricting, Kinzinger had represented 31% of the newly apportioned district, while Manzullo had represented at least 44% of it. In the March Republican primary, Kinzinger defeated Manzullo, 56–44%.[19] In the general election, Kinzinger defeated Democrat Wanda Rohl, 62–38%.[20]

Eric Cantor helped Kinzinger, who was a rising Republican star, topple Manzullo in the Illinois primary.[21]

2014

Kinzinger was targeted by the Club for Growth in 2014.[22] In the Republican primary, he faced David Hale, a nurse and founder of the Rockford Tea Party. Kinzinger won with 78% of the vote.[23][24]

In the general election, Kinzinger defeated Democratic nominee Randall Olsen with 71% of the vote.[25][26]

2016

Kinzinger with U.S. Ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman and Representative Mike Pompeo.

Kinzinger won the March 2016 Republican primary with 100% of the vote.[27] No candidates filed for the Democratic primary for his seat and no Democrat ran in the election; Kinzinger won the election with 99.9% of the vote.

Kinzinger announced publicly that he would not support GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump on August 3, 2016. “I’m an American before I’m a Republican,” he told CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, adding, “I’m a Republican because I believe that Republicanism is the best way to defend the United States of America… [Trump] throws all of these Republican principles on their head.” Kinzinger noted, however, that he also would not support Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, and was mulling other options.[28]

Kinzinger introduced the U.S. House version of the bipartisan bill Countering Foreign Propaganda and Disinformation Act.[29] The United States Senate version was written in March 2016 by Senators Chris Murphy and Rob Portman.[30] After the 2016 U.S. presidential election, worries grew that Russian propaganda spread and organized by the Russian government swayed the outcome of the election, and members of Congress took action to safeguard the national security of the United States by advancing legislation to monitor incoming propaganda from external threats.[30][31] On November 30, 2016, legislators approved a measure within the National Defense Authorization Act to ask the U.S. State Department to take action against foreign propaganda through an interagency panel.[30][31] The legislation authorized funding of $160 million over a two-year period.[30] The initiative was developed through the Countering Foreign Propaganda and Disinformation Act.[30]

2018

Kinzinger defeated Democratic challenger Sara Dady with 59.1% of the vote. After the 2018 midterm elections, which saw all the Republican congressmen representing the Chicago area defeated, he was left as the only Republican representing a significant part of northern Illinois in Congress.

2020

Kinzinger defeated Democrat Dani Brzozowski in the 2020 election with 65% of the vote.

Tenure

Kinzinger speaking at Hudson Institute.

In 2010 Kinzinger signed a pledge sponsored by Americans for Prosperity promising to vote against any global warming legislation that would raise taxes.[32]

Kinzinger sponsored the Veteran Emergency Medical Technician Support Act of 2013. The legislation, which would make it easier for veterans with emergency medical technician training in the military to get civilian licenses to perform the same job outside of the military, passed the House of Representatives by a voice vote but was not voted upon by the Senate.[33]

On June 5, 2014, Kinzinger introduced a bill (H.R. 4801; 113th Congress) which would require the United States Secretary of Energy to prepare a report on the effects that thermal insulation has on both energy consumption and systems for providing potable water in federal buildings.[34][35] Kinzinger argued that “with the federal government being the single largest consumer of energy in the country, doing our best to maximize the potential savings from improved insulation systems is a commonsense step I think everybody can agree on.”[35]

Kinzinger is a member of both the Republican Study Committee and the Republican Main Street Partnership.[36]

Kinzinger visits the Disaster Recovery Center in Marseilles, Illinois.

Conservative Review gave Kinzinger’s voting record a “Liberty Score” of 35%,[37] while the American Conservative Union (ACU) gave Kinzinger a Lifetime Rating of 59.60 out of 100.[38] Kinzinger was ranked as the 40th most bipartisan member of the House during the 114th United States Congress (and the third most bipartisan member of the House from Illinois) in the Bipartisan Index created by The Lugar Center and the McCourt School of Public Policy, which ranks members of Congress by their degree of bipartisanship (by measuring how often each member’s bills attract co-sponsors from the opposite party and each member co-sponsors bills by members of the opposite party).[39]

Kinzinger voted for the 2017 Republican health care legislation, which would have repealed major parts of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare).[40]

Kinzinger voted for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[41][42]

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Kinzinger faced criticism from some Asian American leaders[43] for blaming China for the pandemic at a time that anti-AAPI (Asian American Pacific Islander) hate crimes and coronavirus-related discrimination were rising.[44][45][46][47] Kinzinger authored and retweeted many tweets singling out China for blame.[48][49][50][51][52][53] One such tweet was “Daily reminder: You are in your homes because #Chinahidthevirus.”[54]

According to Jeremy W. Peters, Kinzinger had an uneasy feeling on the day of the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol and asked his wife not to attend the process the finalizing of the election. He also told his office staff not to come to work that day and took his .380 caliber Ruger LCP to the Capital and to the Rayburn House Office Building. Just after 2:18 p.m., Kinzinger received an email from the Capitol Police telling him to stay away from windows, close and lock doors, remain quiet, and silence all electronics. At this point Kinzinger barricaded the doors of his office and took out his gun.[55]

On February 4, 2021, Kinzinger joined 10 other Republican House members voting with all voting Democrats to strip Marjorie Taylor Greene of her House Education and Labor Committee and House Budget Committee assignments in response to controversial political statements she had made.[56]

In March 2021, Kinzinger was one of eight Republicans to join the House majority in passing the Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2021.[57]

On April 9, 2021 Kinzinger called for Matt Gaetz to resign while he was being investigated on sex trafficking charges.[58][59]

On May 19, 2021, Kinzinger and 34 other Republican House members in the 117th Congress voted to create a National Commission to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Complex, intended to probe the storming of the Capitol. They joined all 217 Democrats present to vote to establish such a body.[60][61] After the Senate failed to support the national bipartisan commission due to a Republican filibuster, Kinzinger remained committed to the concept.

On July 1, 2021, Kinzinger voiced disdain about sanctions threatened by Republican leadership against Republican lawmakers who would participate in a House committee to investigate the storming of the Capitol.[62][63] On July 25, he accepted Speaker Pelosi’s appointment of him to the House Committee on the Jan. 6 Attack.[64][65][66]

During a September 5, 2021, interview on CNN‘s State of the Union, Kinzinger said his party “desperately needs to tell the truth”, that if the party pushes lies and conspiracy theories, it does not deserve to win Congressional majorities in the 2022 elections, that if they were “going to be in charge and pushing conspiracy, pushing division, and pushing lies, then the Republican Party should not have the majority”, and that it “is a pretty scary place to go in this world if we start using our power as a way to get the outcome that we want” in elections.[67]

On November 5, 2021, Kinzinger was one of 13 House Republicans to break with their party and vote with a majority of Democrats for the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.[68]

Censure by Republican National Committee

On February 4, 2022, the Republican National Committee called the events of January 6, 2021, a “legitimate political discourse” and overwhelmingly voted by voice vote to censure Kinzinger (and Representative Liz Cheney) for taking part in the House investigation of the Capitol assault.[69]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political positions

Domestic issues

Gun law

Kinzinger is in favor of allowing concealed carry of firearms across state lines where concealed carry is legal.[78]

On March 11, 2021, Kinzinger was one of eight Republican representatives who voted to pass the Bipartisan Background Checks Act of 2021.

Health care

In 2017, Kinzinger voted to repeal the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare).[78]

Economic issues

Kinzinger opposes the Dodd–Frank Act.[78]

Kinzinger has a 94% lifetime rating from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a business-oriented group, and a 49% lifetime rating from the Club for Growth, a conservative group, which advocates for tax cuts, lower spending, deregulation, and free trade.[79][80]

Although many House Republicans previously supported elements of the America COMPETES Act of 2022, Kinzinger was the only minority member to vote for the bill, after their House leadership urged a “No” vote, holding that the bill was too weak on China.[81]

International issues

Iran

On Twitter, Kinzinger praised Donald Trump‘s decision to kill Iranian Major General Qasem Soleimani, Commander of the Quds Force, the third most powerful person in Iran.[82] Reacting to news of the assassination, Kinzinger tweeted, “Mess with the bull, get the horns. If true, nice call, @realdonaldtrump.”[83] He continued tweeting, writing, “killed a man responsible for thousands of deaths in #Syria and elsewhere, including Americans. Let’s see how long the #blameAmerica left takes to make him a poor victim.”[84]

Immigration

Kinzinger supports penalizing sanctuary cities.[78]

Kinzinger supports Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).[85]

Kinzinger voted for the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2020, which authorizes DHS to nearly double the available H-2B visas for the remainder of FY 2020.[86][87]

Kinzinger voted for the Consolidated Appropriations Act (H.R. 1158), which effectively prohibits ICE from cooperating with Health and Human Services to detain or remove illegal alien sponsors of unaccompanied alien children (UACs).[88]

Social issues

Abortion

Kinzinger opposes late term abortion and the use of federal funds for abortion or health coverage that funds abortion.[78]

Cannabis

Kinzinger has a “C−” rating from NORML for his voting history regarding cannabis-related causes. He supported veterans having access to medical marijuana if recommended by their Veterans Health Administration doctor if medical marijuana is legal in their states of residence. He opposed a bill to remove marijuana from the list of scheduled substances under the Controlled Substances Act.[89][90]

LGBTQ rights

Kinzinger voted against the Equality Act.[91][92]

Kinzinger has an 11% rating from the Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest LGBTQ rights advocacy group.[93]

On February 24, 2021, Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene hung a sign outside of her office reading “There are TWO genders: MALE & FEMALE ‘Trust The Science!’” in response to Representative Marie Newman, whose office is directly across from hers and who put a transgender flag outside her office in support of the Equality Act. Kinzinger quote-tweeted Greene and said, “This is sad and I’m sorry this happened. Rep. Newmans [sic] daughter is transgender, and this video and tweet represents the hate and fame driven politics of self-promotion at all evil costs. This garbage must end, in order to #RestoreOurGOP”.[94]

In 2021, Kinzinger was one of 21 House Republicans to sponsor the Fairness for All Act, the Republican alternative to the Equality Act.[95] The bill would prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity, and protect the free exercise of religion.

In 2015, Kinzinger was one of 60 Republicans voting to uphold President Barack Obama’s 2014 executive order banning federal contractors from making hiring decisions that discriminate based on sexual orientation or gender identity.[citation needed]

In 2016, Kinzinger was one of 43 Republicans to vote for the Maloney Amendment to H.R. 5055, which would prohibit the use of funds for government contractors who discriminate against LGBT employees.[96]

In 2022, Kinzinger was one of six Republicans to vote in favor of the Global Respect Act, which imposes sanctions on foreign persons responsible for violations of internationally recognized human rights against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and intersex (LGBTQI) individuals, and for other purposes.[97][98]

Criticism of Donald Trump

Kinzinger voted in line with President Donald Trump about 90% of the time[10] and voted against Trump’s first impeachment,[10][99] but he subsequently became a critic of Trump and made headlines as a rare Republican officeholder willing to criticize him.[100][101] In summer 2020, Kinzinger denounced QAnon and other baseless conspiracy theories that gained currency among Republican voters.[10] After the 2020 presidential election, which Trump lost to Joe Biden, Kinzinger denounced Trump’s claims that the election was stolen and criticized Trump’s attempt to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election.[10] In December 2020, after Trump repeated his claims of fraud on Twitter, Kinzinger tweeted that it was time for Trump to delete his Twitter account.[10][102] He also criticized the Texas Republican Party and called for the firing of its chairman, Allen West, when the party floated the idea of secession, after the Supreme Court rejected Texas v. Pennsylvania, a bid by the state of Texas to overturn the presidential election outcome.[103]

On January 7, 2021, the day after the storming of the U.S. Capitol by a violent pro-Trump mob, Kinzinger became the first Republican member of the House to call for Trump’s removal from office via the 25th Amendment.[104][105] In a video message, Kinzinger said that Trump had “abdicated his duty to protect the American people and the people’s house,” and his behavior made it clear that he had become “unmoored” from both his duties as president and “reality itself.” He urged Vice President Mike Pence and the Cabinet to invoke the 25th Amendment, saying that Trump was “unfit” and “unwell.”[106] Five days later, Kinzinger announced that he would vote in favor of Trump’s second impeachment. He stated that there was “no doubt” that Trump “broke his oath of office and incited this insurrection.” He also accused Trump of using the power of his office to launch a direct attack on Congress. He asked, “If these actions–the Article II branch inciting a deadly insurrection against the Article I branch–are not worthy of impeachment, then what is an impeachable offense?”[107] On January 13, he joined nine other Republicans in voting for impeachment.[10][108][109] In response, some Republicans vowed to support a primary challenge to Kinzinger.[10] Kinzinger received a letter from 11 members of his family asserting he had joined “the devil’s army” for publicly turning against Trump. Kinzinger said the family members suffer from “brainwashing” from conservative churches that led them astray.[110]

On May 19, 2021, Kinzinger was one of 35 Republicans to join all Democrats in voting to approve legislation to establish the formation of a January 6 commission to investigate the storming of the U.S. Capitol.[111] He was also one of two Republicans to join all Democrats in voting for a January 6 select committee.[112]

On November 14, 2021, Kinzinger, in an interview with Rolling Stone, said that he regretted voting against Trump’s first impeachment: “If I went back in time, I would vote for the first impeachment.” In the interview, he also called Tucker Carlson a “manipulative son of a bitch”.[113]

Country First Movement

In early 2021, a few weeks after the 2021 Capitol riot, Kinzinger launched the Country First PAC, as a means to reform the Republican Party and distance itself from far-right conspiracies, including QAnon.[114] In the first quarter of 2021, the PAC raised over $1.1 million to fight Trump’s growing influence over the Republican Party.[115]

Steve Bannon

On October 21, 2021, Kinzinger was one of nine House Republicans to vote to hold Steve Bannon in contempt of Congress.[116]

Electoral history

2010

2010 Illinois’s 11th congressional district Republican Party primary.[117]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Adam Kinzinger 32,233 63.7
RepublicanDave White5,25710.4
RepublicanDavid McAloon4,8809.6
RepublicanHenry Meers Jr.4,5559.0
RepublicanDarrel Miller3,7017.3
Total votes50,626 100
2010 Illinois’s 11th congressional district general election.[117]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Adam Kinzinger 129,108 57.4
DemocraticDebbie Halvorson (incumbent)96,01942.6
Total votes225,127 100

2012

2012 Illinois’s 16th congressional district Republican Party primary.[118]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Adam Kinzinger 45,546 53.9
RepublicanDon Manzullo (Incumbent)38,88946.1
Total votes84,435 100
2012 Illinois’s 16th congressional district general election.[118]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Adam Kinzinger 181,789 61.8
DemocraticWanda Rohl112,30138.2
Total votes294,090 100

2014

2014 Illinois’s 16th congressional district Republican Party primary[119]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Adam Kinzinger (incumbent) 56,593 78.4
RepublicanDavid J. Hale Jr.15,55821.6
Total votes72,151 100
2014 Illinois’s 16th congressional district general election[120]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Adam Kinzinger (incumbent) 153,388 70.6
DemocraticRandall Olsen63,81029.4
Total votes217,198 100
Republican hold

2016

2016 Illinois’s 16th congressional district Republican Party primary[121]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Adam Kinzinger (incumbent) 101,421 100
RepublicanColin M. McGroarty2nil
Total votes101,423 100
2016 Illinois’s 16th congressional district general election[122]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Adam Kinzinger (incumbent) 259,722 100
IndependentJohn Burchardt (write-in)131nil
Total votes259,853 100
Republican hold

2018

2018 Illinois’s 16th congressional district general election[123]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Adam Kinzinger (incumbent) 151,254 59.1
DemocraticSara Dady104,56940.9
IndependentJohn M. Stassi (write-in)2nil
Total votes255,825 100
Republican hold

2020

2020 Illinois’s 16th congressional district general election[124]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanAdam Kinzinger (incumbent) 218,839 64.71 +5.6%
DemocraticDani Brzozowski119,31335.28-5.6%
Write-in7nilN/A
Total votes338,159 100
Republican hold

Personal life

The Wisconsin Red Cross named Kinzinger its 2006 “Hero of the Year” for wrestling a knife-wielding man to the ground and disarming him. The man had cut the throat of a woman on a street in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin.[125] Recalling the event in an interview, Kinzinger said, “The whole time it was, to me, kind of a done deal that I was going to get stabbed in the process, but I knew that this wasn’t something I could wake up to … every day with that memory that I watched her die.”[126] The woman survived. For this act Kinzinger also received the United States Air Force Airman’s Medal and the National Guard’s Valley Forge Cross for Heroism.[127]

Kinzinger was ranked 5th on The Hill's 2011 annual “50 Most Beautiful People” list, which ranks anyone who regularly works on Capitol Hill.[128]

Kinzinger was engaged to Air Force Captain Riki Meyers, a fellow pilot, in 2011; they broke their engagement in 2012.[129][130] Kinzinger became engaged to Sofia Boza-Holman, a former aide to John Boehner and aide to Vice President Mike Pence, in June 2019.[131] They married on February 16, 2020.[132] Their son, Christian Adam Kinzinger, was born in January 2022.[133]

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